Why Women Hate the Big Chill

For years, women have fought for equality in the workplace. Women demand equal pay for equal work, respect, and recognition for a job well done. But could it be that there is one aspect of the office in which women don’t want equality? Since time immemorial men and women seem to have a different definition of comfortable temperature. While men seem to love the blast of the air conditioner in the office, women opt to bundle in layers against the chill. Could there be a science behind this insanity? Here are what some recent findings say.

Temperature Favoritism
Many may say that office favoritism is based on an antiquated system but is the office temperature based on one as well. According to science, the office AC may be more suited towards temperatures compatible with the male body, due to a formula over 50 years old.

According to a 2016 study published in the journal Nature Climate Change, temperatures in office buildings are adjusted according to a formula originating in the 1960’s based on the resting metabolic rate of a 40 -year- old 154p pound man. Times may have changed, but temperature controls have not. Now, more than 50 years later, women are wrapping themselves in sweaters and blankets to be able to sit at their desks without shivering. The study concludes that females prefer a temperature of 77 degrees in the home and office, while men go for a cool 71.6.

Dr. Devi Nampiaparampil of NYU School of Medicine weighs in on the findings. “Women tend to have lower basal metabolic rates, so they tend to burn off energy a lot slower. They actually give off less heat than men, so they tend to be colder.”

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Other Factors
Of course, temperature settings may not be complete to blame. “Women tend to wear skirts,” says Nampiaparampil, “so maybe they have their legs kind of bare and cold and their arms might be out. Mane wears more layers. They tend to wear jackets or suits. You add all these things together, then it’s more likely that the difference between men and women is going to be more pronounced.

The Verdict
But what about productivity levels? Apparently, the lower temperature is not doing anything to help get work done. A study in the New York Times shows people make more mistakes and get less accomplished when the temperature is between 68 and 72 degrees as compared to when it’s between 74 and 76, plus it saves on power bills. The US Department of Energy finds raising the temperature from 72 to 77 degrees can save as much as eleven percent of power. and every degree above 78 saves two percent, while each degree below 78 will add another six percent.

So it seems the ladies win. Or so they? What do you think? Is there some truth in all of this, and if so, what can be done? Will ladies ever get their equality? Let us know!

Woman sweating after a jog

Say No To Heat Related Emergencies

Is it getting hot in here?  Survey says, “It’s getting hot in here.”  Although summertime is a great time for freedom and the great outdoors, there are a few days when even the most dedicated athlete or worker needs to take a break.  When temperatures in the body reach 104 degrees F or higher, cellular damage from the heat will start to occur after about 30 minutes. Since 1979 the death rate from heat-related causes is 0.5 per one million.  But by taking the proper steps, we can get that number down to zero.

Children In Hot Vehicles
It’s tough to be a parent.  You can’t leave children at home alone and babysitters are expensive, but sometimes you need to leave the house.  Small children require extra schlepping.  Even if there is not a stroller involved, there is the carrying, holding hands, and constant urging to walk faster and not to veer into oncoming pedestrians or vehicular traffic.  Then, once the child  is in the store, there is always the possibility that they will stray or find some product that they just can’t live without, hence the unavoidable meltdown.  It is so  tempting to leave them in the car, walk in the store come out and be done with it.  But beware, long lines and indecision could often cause the time you spend in the store to grow, and the more time in the store, the more dangerous it becomes for the child.  And keep in mind, a car can reach 110 degrees even if temperatures are in the 60’s.

Work
We all need to make the rent at the end of the day and, for many of us, taking days is not an option. Workers that work in a hot environment are prime candidates for heat illnesses and injuries.  Heat  can also cause occupational hazards, like when safety glasses get fogged up or sweaty palms cause a loose grip of tools and machinery.  Highest at risk are firefighters, construction workers, miners, and bakery workers among others. Workers over 65 or who are overweight or have high blood pressure are more at risk than others.

Woman sweating

Athletes
The American Health Association advises that the average person gets 4 hours of cardio a week.  Many of us see this as a point of no contention.  They will religiously aim to do a minimum of exercise weekly or daily and may claim to not “feel right” if they don’t.  It is true, that exercise can become addictive. Some miss the rise in endorphins, some miss the routine. The same can be said of athletes.  In blind dedication to a sport or dream, many athletes may push themselves to play and train on days when it is better not to. People exercising in a hot environment are among the most prone to heat exhaustion. There were 5 player deaths in America from 1931 and 1958.  There were 103 player deaths in America between 1960-2000.  Heat exhaustion rates are highest for athletes who play high school football.

What Can We Do?
Don’t make the mistake of trying to do too much on the first hot days of the year.  Do a portion of what you need to and take a break; your body will build up a naturals resistance.Keep yourself hydrated, and skip the alcohol. Do not leave children, elderly people or pets alone in a parked car.  Use cool compresses and keep physical activity to a minimum.  Symptoms of heat exhaustion include paleness, nausea, headache, muscle cramps and heavy sweating.  If you see someone exhibiting these signs, move them to a cooler area and get medical assistance.  There is a 100% chance survival rate for heat exhaustion when proper treatment is given.