Weekend traveler

Skincare Tips For Weekend Travel

The weekend traveler. She’s savvy. Mysterious? Maybe. She’s confident, totally hip, and upwardly mobile. Where is she going? A top secret business trip? A romantic rendezvous? A trip to see Mom? Only she knows. But one things for sure. She’s prepared. And you can bet that applies to her skincare as well.

Travel can be taxing on the skin. Stress, lack of sleep, and, changes in weather, and poor hydration can all take their toll, and you’ve got to arrive looking like a million no matter what. Here are some tips for keeping your skin in shape when you’re OTW.

Moisturize
If you’re getting set to fly, prepare by applying an intense moisturizing formula the night before. It will get your skin ready for the dehydrating effects of cabin pressure.

No Foundation
Experts advise forgoing the foundation on the day of your trip; opt instead for a tinted moisturizer. If you feel incomplete without foundation, makeup artist A.J. Crimson advises applying a primer first to create a barrier between the makeup and your skin. A silicone- based cream or liquid will help prevent dehydration and will also help your blush and foundation last longer.

Mineral Water Mister
If you need a quick skin refresher, try to avoid globbing on more heavy foundation and blush. Instead, use a mister filled with mineral water with a dab of moisturizer instead for a light, quick touch up.

Blot Oily Skin
Pack some rice papers or blotting papers to keep oily skin to a minimum while in travel. Crimson says,”You’ll dab up shine and excess oil without stripping out the moisture.”

Bring on the Shimmer
Who couldn’t use a little extra shimmer from time to time? A soft shimmer cream or powder can be a traveler’s best friend, especially if travel tends to sallow your complexion. Stroke to on the bridge of your nose, the tops of your cheeks, and your lips and you’ll be radiant and no time, no matter how worn out the rest of you feels.

Makeup kit

Avoid the Long Lasting Lipstick
Even the longest lasting lipstick is bound to look a bit less vibrant after a long journey, and, on top of that, the longer wear lipstick formulas are known to parch and dehydrate lips. If your want to arrive with fresh looking lips, Crimson advises that you coat your lips with a few coats of lip stain, let them dry, and finish by applying a clear gloss, reapplying the gloss as needed.

Apply Lip Treatment
Flight attendant Danielle Easton says her flying must have is; “A medicated lip balm, because it won’t rub your lipstick off and keeps lips hydrated while flying.” She also recommends packing lip treatment for long train and bus rides, that tend to rely drying air conditioning and high heat to regulate temperature.

Puffy Eyes
Got puffiness? Pam Inman, vice president of the American Hotel and Lodging Association recommends crushed ice in a washcloth to reduce swelling and puffiness around the eyes. “It’s an automatic wake-up call that makes you look and feel immediately fresher.”

Skip the Mascara
Take a nap and its all over (literally). Same for creamy eye shadows which tend to migrate while you snooze.

Leave Off the Bright Nail Polish
Although you may want to arrive with an impressively detailed manicure, it may backfire on you. Dark and bright colors tend to chip while traveling. Instead, opt for a vigorous buff and natural polish, for a clean look that will not call attention to chips and dings.

If you are the weekend traveler, or are about to be, let us know any skin tips you might have for us. How do you prepare your skin for transit?

Woman showering

Shower Habits That Damage Your Skin

Spoiler alert! If you enjoy taking steamy hot showers, do not read this article. To many of us, a hot steamy shower is the high point of our day. The little cubicle, your own private haven, the steam, unknotting the stress in your muscles and opening the pores of your skin. The acoustics of the tile, providing just the right amount of echo to make the renditions of your favorite pop songs almost listenable. How can this be wrong?

Unfortunately, pleasurable as they may be, long hot showers can be damaging to your skin. While there are ways to mitigate the damage, it may involve making small sacrifices. Read on to find out which shower habits may be harming your skin, if you dare.

Water Temp is Too High
While the water temperature may offer short-term pleasure, the long term effects may be less enjoyable. Hot water can strip skin of its natural oils, drying it out, and causing possible discomfort. Those with eczema should be especially wary of very hot showers, as the skin barrier of eczema sufferers is already weak. If you really can’t live without the steam, try blasting the hot water, allowing steam to build and them decreasing the temperature of the water before it comes into contact with your skin.

Dirty towels

Dirty Towels
Even though it may seem that we emerge from the shower clean and bacteria free, this is not the case. Dead skin cells transfer to towels and can result in growth of bacteria, and even mold. Wash towels regularly and try and leave them in a dry, well-lit environment to cut down on bacterial growth.

Harsh Soap
Although antibacterial soaps are great for stripping pores of dirt and bacteria, it may also strip skin of natural oils and good bacteria that helps skin to maintain a balanced pH level. While antibacterial soaps may work well on your hands, they are not recommended for all over cleansing. Also, you may want to swap the bar soap for a moisturizing, natural body wash. Bar soaps can accumulate bacteria from sitting in a wet, dimly lit shower.

Showering Without Moisturizer
Showers provide the best opportunity for moisturizing, and one that you should definitely take advantage of. Warm water opens the pores, allowing water to hydrate skin and allowing the moisturizer to lock the hydration in. For optimal results, use a soap that contains moisturizing ingredients in addition to your regular lotion.

Woman scrubbing

Overscrubbing
Scrubbing should not be confused with exfoliation. Roughly textured bathing accessories, such as shower brushes and loofahs, can break healthy skin cells, leaving behind raw patches on your skin. These tools also collect bacteria, which, when combined with vulnerable skin, is a recipe for damage. Use mild loofahs and try to keep exfoliation down to once or twice a week.

Hard Water
Unfortunately, the water most of us shower with is “hard.” This means it has chemicals and mineral to purify it. While this makes it safe for showering, it may not be the best thing for our skin, and may clog pores and strip skin of natural oil. However, you can avoid this by purchasing a shower head with a water filter to keep the hard stuff out.

What do you think? Is good skin worth the sacrifice? What price is too much for a great shower? Let us know!