Happy smiling middle-age woman with short wavy hair

Keeping Your Skin Healthy At Every Age

It is no secret that as your body ages, your skin is going to go through quite a few changes, with your skin in your 20’s being extremely different to your skin in your 50’s.

This is why it is so important to keep adjusting your skin care routine as you progress through life, adopting different ingredients and techniques at each stage, as this will help to cater to your skin’s ever-changing needs.

Skin Care in Your 20’s

When you are in your 20’s, it may seem as though the firm and tight skin you have always known is going to last forever, but, unfortunately, this is not true.

In fact, your 20’s is when things begin to slow down in your skin…

In particular, cell turnover.

This is the rate at which your body sheds its old skin cells, to make way for new ones. In your teens and younger years, your cell turnover rate is every 14 days. However, as you progress through your 20’s, this declines to every 24 to 30 days.

Infographic on different layers of skin

Collagen is another key element of your skin that begins to decline in your mid-20’s.

What is collagen?

It is one of the building blocks of your skin, and is the protein that largely makes up your skin’s structure. Once you reach your mid-20’s, the rate at which the collagen in your body breaks down overtakes the rate at which you naturally produce new collagen.

This means that skin aging is not too far away…

So, what can you do about this?

Well, seeing as up to 90% of facial wrinkles are caused by the sun’s UV rays, wearing sun cream is essential. If you are not already doing this every day, then this is something to begin doing right now.

When it comes to your declining collagen production and slower cell turnover…

Start using a retinol product.

Retinol is a derivative of vitamin A, and is one of the most potent anti-aging ingredients out there, with one of its greatest benefits being the way in which it speeds up cell turnover. Not only that, but it also stimulates your natural collagen production, helping to increase this so that production once again outweighs breakdown.

Skin Care in Your 30’s

While you may have been completely confident in your skin in your 20’s, you are much more likely to experience a few panicked moments in relation to your skin in your 30’s.

This decade tends to be the one where you experience your first static lines and wrinkles.

These are lines that do not fade when your face is resting, and are usually due to the continued decrease of collagen in your body.

If you are not yet using a retinol product, then now is the time to start, for the same reasons as mentioned in the 20’s section before.

Another key component in your skin that begins to noticeably decline in your 30’s is hyaluronic acid.

You may have already noticed this ingredient in many skin care products out there, but do you know what it actually is?

Hyaluronic acid is a molecule that occurs naturally in the body, and can be found in so many different parts of the body. So, when your natural levels of hyaluronic acid begin to decline, it only makes sense to top these back up.

But what exactly does hyaluronic acid do for the skin?

Well, this ingredient is a humectant, meaning that it draws moisture from the air into its molecules and then holds this water there. Your skin then absorbs this moisture, helping it to stay hydrated for longer.

Hyaluronic acid can also help with:

  • Wrinkles
  • Sagging skin
  • A damaged skin barrier
  • Wound healing
  • UV damage

Hyaluronic acid can be found in everything, from serums to creams. The most effective tends to be a serum, as their thin consistency means that they are more easily absorbed by the skin.

When choosing a product, make sure that it contains at least 1% hyaluronic acid, as this is the amount needed in order for the ingredient to really have an impact. 

Infographic on younger versus older skin

How else can you care for your skin in your 30’s?

By incorporating antioxidants into your skin care routine.

Your skin is constantly under attack from free radicals, which are caused by everything from sun exposure to pollution. Simply put, free radicals are atoms that are missing an electron. In order to “heal” themselves, they will try to steal electrons from nearby cells, thereby damaging those cells, as well as their DNA.

Free radicals are one of the primary causes of aging, which is why this is something worth focusing on.

How do antioxidants help?

They provide free radicals with the electron that they are missing, therefore healing them and stopping them from attacking other cells in the body.

So, which antioxidants should you be using?

In addition to retinol, give these a try:

  • Resveratrolthis is an antioxidant that comes from plant-based foods, such as red wine, blueberries and cacao beans, and provides so many benefits for the skin, from brightening to anti-inflammatory 
  • Vitamin Chelps to strengthen the skin, while calming and hydrating it

Don’t forget…

Antioxidants work best when used in conjunction with each other, so try adding multiple antioxidants to your skin care routine.

Skin Care in Your 40’s

Those light lines that you noticed appearing on your face in your 30’s will begin to deepen in your 40’s, making them much more noticeable.

All of the natural declines from your 30’s, such as collagen production and hyaluronic acid, continue on, with cell turnover also decreasing down to every 30 to 42 days. You will notice that your skin feels much less resilient, and that it does not “bounce back” in quite the same way anymore.

Another common skin change that many experience in their 40’s is dryness…

Wondering what causes this?

The outer layer of your skin consists of a protective barrier, whose role is not only to protect your skin from environmental damage, but also to retain moisture.

As the body ages, this barrier weakens, meaning that your skin experiences a far greater loss of moisture.

Infographic on healthy and damaged skin barrier

Fortunately, there is an easy way to deal with this, and this is by switching to a much richer and thicker moisturizer. You may also need to moisturize more frequently throughout the day, in order to compensate for the extra moisture loss.

Another skin issue that may arise in your 40’s is hyperpigmentation.

This is when melanin, which is the pigment that gives your skin its color, is over-produced in some areas of the skin, causing those areas to darken. This can vary greatly in terms of shape and size, as well as placement on the skin.

Here are a few tips on how to deal with this:

  • Use a sunscreen – UV exposure only encourages your skin to produce more melanin, which you are trying to prevent
  • Use a gentle chemical exfoliant this helps to speed up the cell renewal rate
  • Use a lightening cream such as one containing kojic acid or hydroquinone

One key ingredient that you should be using in your 40’s are ceramides…

These are naturally one of the main components of your skin’s surface, and are an integral part of your skin’s matrix and structure.

However, with age, the body’s natural production of ceramides declines, meaning that the skin then begins to lose its firm structure and supple surface.

Research shows that the topical use of ceramides can really help with this, improving suppleness, roughness, uniformity, hydration and overall glow

Skin Care in Your 50’s

Once you have gone through menopause, your skin will be experiencing even more drastic changes.

Due to the drop in estrogen levels, the skin becomes much thinner and more fragile, meaning that it is even less able to retain moisture

Not only that, but research shows that, in the first five years after menopause, 30% of your collagen is lost.

This may sound frightening, but there are still several steps that you can take to keep your skin looking youthful and healthy.

Begin by making sure that you are already following all of the tips mentioned in each section above. While you may not be able to reverse your skin’s changes, you will still be able to brighten and nourish the one you have, preventing the changes from worsening.

A multi-step skin care routine is vital, and this should be something that you follow each and every day.

Wondering what the multiple steps should consist of?

Here are some guidelines:

  • A cleanser – this should always be the first step of any skin care routine, as it allows subsequent products to easily penetrate into the skin and work much better
  • A tonerthis helps to rebalance your skin’s pH level, which is often disrupted through cleansing
  • Exfoliant/peelthis is important to keep the surface of your skin looking smooth and vibrant. It will also encourage your natural cell turnover
  • Masksthese can be used on a weekly basis to give your skin a deeper treatment. Look for masks that address your specific skin concerns, whether this may be hyperpigmentation, wrinkles, or dry skin
  • Eye serums and creamsthe skin around your eyes is so delicate, and eye products are formulated to be gentle enough to nourish and care for this area without harming it
  • Face serumsserums are thin and lightweight, meaning that they quickly and easily penetrate the skin. While they may not look much different to water, serums are actually packed with a high concentration of active ingredients, which is why they are so effective at tackling various skin issues
  • Moisturizeras mentioned above, the moisturizer you are using now should be rich, thick, and packed with antioxidants

Skin Care in Your 60’s and Beyond

If you have worked out a skin care routine that is working for your skin in your 50’s, then stick to it through your 60’s, adjusting and adding in individual products when needed.

If you have been caring for your skin well throughout your life, then, by the time you reach your 60’s, you will be able to tell what your skin does and does not need.

One example of a product that you may want to add into your routine at this stage in life is targeted wrinkle creams. These are potent formulas that come with a small applicator that enables you to directly apply them to each wrinkle.

Of course, skin care is internal as well as external, and caring for your skin from within can really help to maintain a healthy glow throughout your later years.

How can you care for your skin from within?

Here are a few tips:

  • Diet – make sure that you are consuming a healthy diet, filled with plenty of fresh, whole foods, and with a minimum amount of processed foods 
  • Sleepadequate quality sleep is so important, although you may find that you need slightly less sleep as you age
  • Exerciseexercise is one of the best things that you can do for your skin, no matter what age you may be
  • Stressstress leads to nothing but problems in the skin, so try to find some stress management techniques that work well for you

Calm woman meditating at work

By understanding the changes that your skin goes through as your body ages, you will be able to provide it with exactly what it needs. From the preventative steps that you can take in your 20’s, to the healthy lifestyle changes you can make in your later years, it is well worth taking the time to keep your skin healthy, no matter what age you may be.

 

Dehydrated woman with a bottle of water outdoors

Do You Know The Signs of Dehydration?

Every once in a while we all need some detoxification. Whether it be a full on week-long cleanse, or just the occasional good sweat, many of us derive satisfaction out of releasing chemicals from our bodies, bringing us back to the elemental purity our bodies were made in, relaxing and rejuvenating us. Of course, this process also involves losing water, but that’s par for the course. You just drink a little more of it to compensate, right?

While most of the time, our bodies replace water pretty easily, sometimes we can lose a little too much, and that can set our bodies off, because, as we know, our bodies do love their water. Dehydration happens when your body is not getting enough of the water it needs. Here are some ways to recognize and prevent the signs of dehydration.

Causes
We sweat; we breathe; we poop, we cry; we spit; we lose water, and that’s ok. We usually can get it right back by eating foods with water and drinking fluids. But, if you lose too much or don’t eat or drink enough, dehydration can occur. Unusual water loss can be caused by fever, vomiting, diarrhea, excessive sweating, and urinating a lot (diuretics can make you pee more often.)

You might not compensate for the loss because you don’t know you’re thirsty, you’re busy and forget to drink, or you don’t feel like drinking because you don’t feel good.

Symptoms
Dehydration symptoms usually include a dry mouth, thirst, muscle cramps, headaches, decreased urination, dark yellow urine, and cool, dry skin.

Symptoms of more severe dehydration include lack of urination or very dark yellow urine, dizziness, overly dry skin, rapid breathing, rapid heartbeat, sleepiness, confusion, irritability, sunken eyes and fainting.

Symptoms for young babies and children may be slightly different than those of adults. For example, dry diapers for three hours may be a sign, as might lack of tears when crying, sleepiness, irritability, and lack of energy, sunken cheeks and eyes, a soft spot on the top of the skull, and a dry tongue and mouth.

woman drinking water

High-Risk Groups
While anyone can be affected by dehydration, the odds are higher for some.

  • Babies and children
    Since this group is the most likely to have severe vomiting and diarrhea, they are most likely to lose water from a high fever.
  • Older Adults
    More mature adults have less water in their bodies and often are not as sensitive to thirst.
  • Sick People
    People with sore throats and colds may not feel like drinking or eating.
  • People With a Chronic Disease
    Individuals with uncontrolled diseases like type 2 diabetes can pee a lot. They may also take medicines such as water pills, which increase urination.
  • Active People
    Those who are active outdoors in humid and hot weather sometimes can’t cool down properly because their sweat fails to evaporate, leading to a higher body temperature and not enough water.

What are you doing to prevent dehydration this summer? Let us know how you’re keeping up and cooling off. We love to know!

Woman getting a spa treatment

Destress for Healthy Skin

There are so many factors that contribute, whether positively or negatively, to the health of your skin and stress is one of them. Stress levels continue to rise with a seemingly endless to-do list, commitments and responsibilities. In fact, stress and its impact on your skin has given rise to a new field of skincare known as “psychodermatology.” Karen Mallin, PsyD and an instructor in the departments of psychiatry, behavioral science and dermatology and cutaneous surgery at the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, predicts that psychodermatology is going to become increasingly popular over the next few years.

“Psychodermatology is a field that addresses the impact of an individual’s emotion as it relates to the skin. The mind and skin are connected on many levels. A lot of nerve endings are connected to the skin, which wraps around the organs, so as emotions are played out neurologically, they can be expressed through the skin just as stress can be expressed through gastrointestinal symptoms, increased anxiety or hypertension,” explains Mallin. Below, find a few ways to destress so both your brain and your skin can remain calm.

Woman exercising

Exercise
A quick way to relieve stress and boost your mood is to take a quick exercise break. Even a 10 minute walk around the block or spending a few minutes going up and down stairs will help you clear your head and minimize stress. Exercise also boosts your circulation, which increases blood flow to the skin. Try to take a walk each day during your lunch hour to fight stress and improve your skin.

Green tea

Drink Some Tea
Some people find tea to be not only a relaxing drink, but also an entirely relaxing experience. Green tea is an excellent drink for fighting stress and for keeping your skin healthy. The antioxidants in green tea provide protection from free radicals, which can cause additional harm to your skin.

Aromatherapy

Aromatherapy
Essential oils are another way that you can reduce stress levels while also providing benefits to your skin. Lavender essential oil promotes relaxation, but it can also stimulate the regeneration of skin cells and can fade the appearance of signs of aging like sun spots or scarring. Lemon essential oil is a stimulating scent that brings feelings of peace and positivity. Additionally, it is a natural astringent and antibacterial, meaning that it can be especially helpful if you struggle with breakouts or acne.

There are other ways that you can reduce stress such as meditation or engaging in a hobby or activity that you find particularly enjoyable. Taking some time out of every day to focus on eliminating stress not only has a positive impact on your mood, but it also significantly impacts the health of your skin.