Woman sitting on bathroom counter

Understanding Your Body’s Response To Hormones

Hormones, can’t live with ’em, can’t live without ’em. When you’re a teen, they hit you like a mac truck, wreaking havoc on your formerly clear skin and relatively easy going parents. Then, just when you thought you’d got them under control, the 40’s hit, hormone levels go down and you’re wishing for just a smidgeon of the estrogen you had in high school. Hormones can be a tricky thing, and sometimes they can seem to have a lot more control over your skin than you do, but there is a way to make peace. Read on for a little insight on hormone fluctuations, what to expect, and how to deal with them.

The Teen Years
When girls hit the ages of around 12 or 13, the introduction of hormones begins. The female body starts to produce estrogens and androgens in high quantities and the skin is impacted. Estrogen is responsible for the “female aesthetic”, causing breasts to develop and giving the hips their curves. In the skin, estrogen decreases the size of pores, giving it a smooth surface and builds elastin and collagen to give skin elasticity and maintain moisture. However, it is the male hormones which lead to the oiliness. Androgens, including testosterone, stimulate hair growth, enlarging pores and boosting sebum, the oily substance in the skin. The result? Acne.

The 20’s and 30’s
The twenties and thirties are definitely the best it gets as far as hormones are concerned. Estrogen peaks and the testosterone boosts sebum, giving skin radiant glow. The hormones are in balance.

The 30’s and 40’s
Of course, nothing gold can stay. After the estrogen effect peaks at around the age of 25, it begins to drop, slightly in the 30’s and more noticeably in the 40’s. Production of collagen and elastin decrease and the skin begins to lose elasticity, affecting the aging skin in a far greater capacity than sun damage. By the late 40’s women enter perimenopause, the purgatory between ovulation and menopause. Hormones cycles change and women may notice a resurgence of acne, an increase in facial hair, and thinning hair on the scalp.

50’s and Up
Most women have reached menopause by the age of 50. Estrogen and testosterone production declines, and with it, the skin manufactures less collagen and elastin. In fact, according to a study in the Venus Week, collagen production declines 2.1% every year in the 15 years following menopause, leading to a 30% decrease in collagen between the ages of 50 and 65. Hot flashes may occur and the skin will get drier, thinner, and more wrinkled.

Controlling Hormones
Because hormone fluctuations are often the result of excess weight and lack of exercise, a good dietary and exercise regimen is key in maintaining hormonal balance. However, underweight women are also at risk for hormonal imbalances. Experts advise aiming for a body mass index between 20 and 25.

Women in their 20s can control acne by using face cleanser including salicylic acid, while older women with decreased skin elasticity should use an exfoliant weekly and an antioxidant containing moisturizer. Retinoids can help with wrinkles, and all women should wear sun screen, as sun damage can intensify unwanted changes in the skin.

The first step to finding treatment is diagnosing the problem. Says Rebecca Booth, MD, “Women must first understand the effects of their hormones on the skin and overall health to seek lifestyle changes to navigate these natural fluctuations. With the power of knowledge, they can seek solutions to achieve the maximum flow of hormonal balance all month long and all life long.”

Are your hormones wreaking havoc on your skin? Let us know how you’re coping. We love to hear from you.

Teenage boy with parents

Resveralife Reports: Studies Find that Teens Need More Time With Parents

We’re all guilty of it: as parents, life is hectic, busy, and downright overwhelming at times. In this day and age, it can be difficult to find time to take a bathroom break let alone set aside time for ourselves. Many of us have a difficult time managing the small amount of time we are given in the day, fitting everything in that needs to be done. Often times, we tend to overlook things that should be more important to us – family.

Studies have shown that not only do young children need time with their parents, but teens do, too. Now more than ever before, teenagers are making themselves heard and letting their parents know that they need more time with dear mom and dad. Resveralife wants to offer you some tips and advice on how you can go about implementing more time with your teen, and things you can do together to make that time memorable.

Make Time

Rushing around all day long may leave you frazzled and stressed by day’s end. Work should be left at work, as home and family life should come first and foremost once you walk through the door. Perhaps you have your entire after work schedule booked for a month out with friends, clubs, organizations and personal appointments. Change them. Break dates. Do whatever it is you need to do to ensure you are available for your teen. They deserve your time more than anything and anyone else does, and the only one capable of making time for them is you. Don’t let precious time slip by so you’re left regretting the time not spent in the end. Rather, be sure to set aside a specific time frame that is just for them so they can feel special every single day. Take one day out of the weekend and do something special together as well. Take a bike ride, a walk, or watch a movie. Whatever you do, make it count – life is short, and we only have our children for a short while before they leave home and head off to college, or move away. Embrace the time you can have with them here and now.

Find Common Ground

Find topics you both can relate to, and talk about them. Find out what they’re interested in, and show a genuine interest in the topic. Even if it’s something you know nothing about, show interest. Doing some research on their favorite band or singer or perhaps that particular hobby they have might allow you to appreciate it more how they see it. Find activities you are both interested in, and pursue them together.

Be Non Judgmental

One of the biggest reasons why teens feel as though they can’t talk to their parents is because they are afraid their parents might disapprove of them or what is on their mind. Keep an open mind and let them know you are always available for them to talk to you – no matter the topic, or the time. If they feel the need to wake you up in the middle of the night because they can’t sleep and need advice, get up, make some hot chocolate, sit at the table with them and be there. It can really hurt a teen’s confidence to know they can’t approach their parents about any topic, no matter how big or small. Show them unconditional love – no matter what.

Let Them Know You Love Them

Everyone expresses love in different ways, but teens need to know you love them just as much – if not more – than children. They like to be told you love and care about them. High school can take a toll on a teen’s mentality, and the struggles they are faced with every day, including making good decisions, choosing the right types of friends, and even who they choose to date – all comes down to whether or not they feel loved. For girls, this is a very impressionable time in which they could opt to make the wrong decision based upon their emotional well-being. Much the same for boys, the teen years is where a boy learns to become a man and exhibits signs of how the rest of his life will be. If a teen feels loved, he is more than likely to exhibit that love in healthy ways rather than make bad decisions.

No matter what you have going on in your life, always remember to make time out for your teen. They love getting your advice and spending time with you, even if they might not act like it at times. They’re still children, and they still need their parents. Push life aside and make room for your teen today.