Red wine by the fireplace.

Top Malbec Wines

It seems that wines come and go in popularity and one wine that is still enjoying a celebrated status is Malbec, particularly Argentine Malbec. The Malbec grape has its origins in France, like many grape varietals, though it is the fruity flavors of Malbec from Argentina that is currently being highly revered by wine enthusiasts. Malbec often features strong fruit flavors such as:

  • Blackberry
  • Black cherry
  • Blueberry
  • Plum
  • Pomegranate
  • Raspberry

Secondary flavors include:

  • Black pepper
  • Cocoa
  • Coffee
  • Gravel
  • Green stem
  • Leather
  • Milk chocolate
  • Mocha
  • Molasses
  • Tobacco

Malbec Wine
Malbec is now most frequently associated with Argentina, but the grape did originate in France. It was a commonly used blending grape in Bordeaux’s top wines, but was not the easiest grape to grow in that region. Malbec grapes respond poorly to extreme weather or temperature and have little to no pest resistance. The first Malbec planted in Argentina was in Mendoza by a French botanist wanting a taste of home. Argentina is credited with having “saved” Malbec because the grape flourishes in this environment. Part of what makes Malbec such a popular wine is that it pairs well with such a wide variety of foods, it has a medium acidity and it does not have a long finish like that of a Cabernet Sauvignon. If you aren’t sure where to start with Malbec wines, here are our top picks:

Trapiche 2006 Vina Federico Villafane Single Vineyard Malbec (Mendoza Region)
This Argentine Malbec is one of the greatest values when it comes to high-end, luxury Malbec wines. That being said, it is still pricey at $50 per bottle, but you may want to consider the splurge for such a decadent wine. The Trapiche 2006 Vina Federico Villafane Single Vineyard Malbec provides an intensive burst of black fruits, such as black cherries, at the onset and is followed by very subtle finishing flavors. This Malbec is a lush, ripe wine that also features hints of cola mixed with the black fruit.

Hess Collection 2012 Small Block Series Malbec (Napa Valley)
Again, this Malbec hailing from Napa Valley, California is not a low price point wine. This Malbec costs $55 per bottle, but like the Malbec listed above, you may not want to write this Malbec off on price alone. The Hess Collection 2012 Small Block Series Malbec is a rich wine that provides wonderful flavors of blueberry cobbler, blackberries and a bit of licorice at at first with little acidity and very soft tannins. The finishing notes of this Malbec are vanilla and chocolate with a hint of spice.

Jean-Luc Baldes 2008 Clos Triguedina Les Galets Malbec (Cahors)
While Argentine Malbec heavily features opening fruit flavors, Malbec wines produced in France are often quite different. The Jean-Luc Baldes 2008 Clos Triguedina Les Galets Malbec has a very mineral-like flavor and texture that mingles with black fruits. At $25 per bottle, you will definitely want to try this French Malbec.

Malbec is a wine that everyone can enjoy. It often features low to medium acidity and softer tannins than other red varietals. Malbec from Argentina has strong, dense flavors of dark fruits while French Malbec is often more earthy with flavors described as green stem, black pepper and spice. No matter what your mood or meal is, there is sure to be a Malbec that fits perfectly.

Red wine poured in a glass.

History of Merlot Wine

Merlot is one of the most popular wines in the entire world. In the United States, it ranks second most popular behind Cabernet Sauvignon. However, in the past few years wine experts and connoisseurs have deemed Merlot to be an unworthy wine. Perhaps this is because it tends to be an easy-drinking wine with a smooth texture and finish and low, unobtrusive tannins. Merlot wine may be easy-to-drink and beginner friendly, but that does not mean that seasoned wine drinkers cannot enjoy or appreciate fine Merlot wine. Merlot is a classic wine, with origins dating back to 19th century France. Learn more about the history of this velvety red wine below.

Earliest Mentions
The earliest mention of Merlot in France was written in the notes of a Bordeaux official in 1784. This local official noted that the wine coming from the Libournais region was among the best in the area. In this document, Merlot was named Merlau. It was not until the 1800s that the word Merlot was used in reference to the wine. In 1824, an article on Medoc wine described that the Merlot grape was named after the local blackbird. There are two thoughts regarding the naming of the grape: one is that it was named because local blackbirds loved to eat the ripe Merlot grapes and the other is that the grape (and wine) was named simply due to the color of the blackbirds. Merlot was first recorded in Italy around Venice and was called by the name Bordo.

Modern Merlot
The most famous region for growing the Merlot grape is the Bordeaux region in France. The Medoc region, though generally known for its Cabernets, devotes 40% of its planting space to Merlot grapes. Merlot is the third most popularly planted grape in France. The Merlot grape also thrives in the northeast Italy and is currently rapidly being grown in Eastern Europe. Merlot wine reached peak popularity in the United States during the 1990s, but it experienced a drop in popularity after the movie Sideways poked fun at the wine. Modern Merlot often features the following notes and flavors:

  • Fruity Flavors – Merlot can have fruit flavors such as raspberries, dried cherries, blackberries, blackcurrant and plum.
  • Spices – The region in which the Merlot grape is grown affect the spices that are present in the wine but some common spices are cloves, mint, caramel, bay leaves and black pepper.
  • Oak Flavors – Again, it will depend on whether the Merlot has been lightly or heavily oaked, but some of the resulting flavors are smoke, tar and oak for heavily oaked Merlots and vanilla and coconut in lightly oaked Merlots.
  • Age of the Bottle – Wine gains new flavors in the aging process and Merlots have some interesting notes from aging. Common flavors include earth, tobacco, leather and coffee.

Knowing a bit of history about the wines you prefer is a bit of fun and it gives you an appreciation for where the wine originated and what the wine has become. Merlot truly is one of the best red wines for beginners, though that does not mean that a seasoned wine veteran cannot enjoy its fruity flavors and smooth finish. Merlot also pairs with a large variety of foods, making it less stressful to find a great combination. Sit back, relax and enjoy a glass of Merlot at the end of a long day.

Red wine poured in a glass

Artificial Intelligence and Wine

The technology we use changes daily as major discoveries continue to be made. One area of technology that is rapidly making advancements is artificial intelligence. Artificial intelligence refers to two things:  the intelligence that is displayed by computers or machines and the academic field dedicated to creating computers and software that is capable of intelligent behavior. Some of the goals in artificial intelligence research are the ability to reason, plan, learn and manipulate objects. A few days ago, the renowned U.K. wine publication Harpers Wine and Spirit, published an article that brings the world of fine wine and artificial intelligence together.

A study at University College, London studied the ability of artificial intelligence to predict wine industry trends against human ability to make the same predictions. It seems that not only can artificial intelligence be used to predict trends, but it is far more accurate. In fact, the study found that artificial intelligence was 98% more accurate in determining fluctuations in the price of fine wines than humans were. In order to be able to predict fluctuations in prices of fine wine, those conducting the study used machine-learning technologies. These technologies allow the computer to identify what pieces of data are the most important when it comes to analyzing changes in the pricing of fine wines. The software tested 100 wines used in the study and these wines were selected using the Liv-ex 100 wine index.

Professor John Shawe-Taylor is the so-director for the University College, London Center for Computational Statistics and Machine Learning. Professor Shawe-Taylor is also the head of the university’s Computer Science department. As a study co-author, Professor Shawe-Taylor says, “Machine learning involves developing algorithms that automatically learn from new data without human intervention. We’ve created intelligent software that searches the data for useful information which is then extracted and used, in this case for predicting the values of wines. Since we first started working on machine learning at UCL, our methods have been used in a wide variety of industries, particularly medical and financial, but this is the first time we have entered the world of fine wine.”

The University College, London study partnered with Invinio, a company founded by UCL alumnus, Dr. Tristan Fletcher. Invinio is a quantitative wine asset management consulting firm. University College, London graduate, Michelle Yeo, lead the research along with Invinio. She was pleased with the results of the study saying, “We’re pleased we were able to develop models applicable to fine wines and we hope our findings give the industry confidence to start adopting machine learning methods as a tool for investment decisions.”

Ultimately, the study authors hope that this advancement in artificial intelligence will benefit wine investors. Using this technology, investors will be able to make more informed decisions regarding their wine portfolios. Additionally, the study authors are hopeful that those who do not invest in wine will be more interested in investing due to the information in this study. For now, Invinio and UCL will continue to work together to provide investors with information. Eventually, the study authors would like to expand this technology into other asset categories, such as classic cars.

Spaghetti and wine

Resveralife Eat Well: Merlot Food Pairing Guide

The Merlot grape is the second most prominent grape variety in the world when it comes to planting. Second only to Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot is also the most consumed red wine in the United States. Often, what comes to mind when you hear the world Merlot are notes of red fruits, easy tannins, a velvety texture and a smooth finish. While it is often considered an “easy” drinking wine, Merlot can have concentrated, firm tannins that rival the best Cabernet Sauvignons. The majority of Merlot, however, is a lighter, fruitier wine that pairs well with a large variety of foods. Most Merlots feature flavors of:

  • Blackberries
  • Blueberries
  • Raspberries
  • Currants
  • Black cherries
  • Plums
  • Cassis
  • Chocolate

Merlots may also have hints of black olives, cedar, licorice and tobacco. The type of Merlot you drink will largely depend upon the climate in which it was grown. Cool climates yield a silky, soft-tannin Merlot while warmer climates lean towards a full-bodied, acidic Merlot. While Merlot is a joy to drink on its own, Resveralife has put together some foods that help bring out and enhance the flavors of Merlot.

Cheese platter and wine.

Cheese
Truthfully, Merlot and cheese are not the best pairing. Merlot pairs better with meatier, more substantial foods. However, that does not mean you can’t pair Merlot with cheeses. Here are some well-paired cheeses for Merlot:

  • Camembert
  • Smoked Cheddar
  • Gouda
  • Gruyere
  • Smoked Provolone
  • Parmesan

Juicy hamburger and fries.

Main Courses
Merlot is a highly versatile wine and pairs with a number of dinner options from hearty vegetarian dishes to meals featuring red meat. One of the easiest food pairings is a classic, thick and juicy hamburger. If you prefer a cheeseburger, add some medium sharp cheddar to your burger. Another relatively easy to make dish is classic spaghetti and meatballs. Not only are the meatballs a great accompaniment to Merlot, but the tomato sauce cuts through the acidity of Merlot as well. You can also create a charcuterie platter that features an assortment of smoked meats.

For vegetarians and others who enjoy main courses that use vegetables as the center, there are multiple Merlot pairings that you can create. One of the tastiest vegetarian dishes is to create a vegetable red curry. The vegetables you choose are completely up to you, but some suggestions are eggplant, potato, and asparagus. Another great vegetarian pairing for Merlot is eggplant rollatini. This blends creamy, tomato based sauce and eggplant for a dish that seems made for Merlot.

Dessert and wine

Sweets
As a general rule when pairing food and wine, desserts are paired with dessert wines, but that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy a Merlot with sweet foods. A fruit tray full of blackberries, red grapes, black cherries and plum is a perfect end to a meal served with Merlot. You could also serve Merlot with a creamy dark chocolate mousse topped with blackberries and raspberries.

Merlot is an incredibly popular wine worldwide and with the generous pairings the wine allows it is no surprise that people love to drink it. Experiment with Merlots produced in different climates for the full effect of what the Merlot grape is capable of. Remember that when it comes to wine and food, the most important rule to follow is to eat, and drink, what you like.

Red wine and antipasto.

Resveralife Live Well: Our Favorite Wine Pairings

When it comes to pairing food with wine, many people feel completely and utterly intimidated. However, you don’t have to worry about doing something “right” or “wrong” when it comes to pairing foods with wines. The number one rule when it comes to food and wine pairings is to pair what you like. If you are looking for a little guidance, we’ve put together a list of some of our favorite wine pairings.

Champagne and caviar.

Champagne and Caviar
Yes it may sound a bit snobby, but there is a reason that champagne and caviar have been paired together since ancient Russian Czars paired these two together. Champagne can pair easily with almost any dish because it has a lower alcohol content, bubbly texture and a refreshing, not overpowering, acidity. Caviar by itself can be an acquired taste as it is salty, oily and has an entirely unique texture. But when put together, Champagne is absolutely perfect for caviar because the acidity of the Champagne helps dissolve any weird, overwhelming fishy tastes. This crisp, refreshing pairing is a truly classic food and wine pairing.

Sauternes and Foie Gras.

Sauternes and Foie Gras
Another classic food and wine pairing is a rich Sauternes and foie gras. Sauternes is produced in the Sauternes region of France using the Semillion and Sauvignon Blanc grapes. The result is an impressively sweet wine with flavors and notes of peaches, apricots and honey. The sweetness of this wine is a result of the “noble mold,” Botrytis. Botrytis does not occur everywhere in the world, as it is produced when moisture meets the sun at the precisely correct time to create the perfect mold. Foie gras is a delicacy made from livers of ducks or geese. The result is a remarkably rich dish that requires a rich wine to meet its own richness. The sweetness of a good Sauternes cut through the rich foie gras to create an impeccable pairing. It is important to note that Sauternes can be quite a bit more expensive than other wine varieties because of the rareness of Botrytis.

Chardonnay and lobster.

Chardonnay and Lobster
Chardonnay is a rich, buttery wine produced around the world. California Chardonnays feature the aforementioned buttery richness and tropical fruit. The result is a big, rich Chardonnay. Lobster is a bit heavier than most seafood, so it requires a wine that has more weight than other seafood while still complimenting flavors of lobster. Additionally, lobster is most commonly served alongside a large amount of melted butter, which requires a special wine as well. The Chardonnays produced in California are buttery enough to stand up to lobster yet sweet enough to compliment lobster perfectly.

Some basic wine pairing tips are:

  • Generally speaking, wine should match the color of the meat
  • High tannin wines require rich, meaty foods
  • Wines that feature earthy flavors go well with foods that have earthy flavors
  • Salads tend to work well with wines that are high in acidity
  • Dessert wines should be a sweeter wine

As we mentioned before, the perfect pairing for you is a wine and a food that you love. For the most intense flavor combination, take a bite of your food, a sip of your wine and chew together to create entirely new flavors and textures.

Friends having fun in a summer BBQ

Resveralife Eat Well: Wine to Pair with Summer BBQs

The summer has not come to an end yet; you still have plenty of time to gather your family and friends for a great backyard barbecue. Whether grilling or preparing real, smoked barbecue, an informal gathering for great food, drink and company is welcome. The beverages of choice commonly associated with backyard barbecues are lemonade, soft drinks, iced tea and beer. Wine is often left out of the barbecue festivities because it can be hard to know what wine to pair with what food you’re making. The first rule of wine pairing is to eat and drink what you like. After all, your enjoyment is the most important aspect of having wine with your favorite foods. However, Resveralife does have several general suggestions when it comes time to uncork your wine bottles and fire up the grill.

Pork brisket on a grill.

Brisket
The Texas staple when it comes to barbecue, beef brisket is definitely a great barbecue food. Often made with a dry rub, brisket begins very fatty but the fat is rendered off of the meat during the smoking process. Because brisket tends to have dry rubs full of spice (and perhaps a hint of sugar) and true brisket is served without sauce, the wine you pair with it needs to be rich and full. A Cabernet Sauvignon is a great pairing for brisket because it features earthy, complex flavors. If you want something that plays perfectly off of the smoky taste of the brisket, consider a Shiraz, which also has earthy notes but also a slight smokiness.

Chicken on a grill.

Grilled Chicken
Chicken, because it is a light meat, is often paired with white wines. Perhaps the most common chicken/white wine pairing is Chardonnay. You can easily enjoy a Chardonnay, just be sure that smooth and dry and not overly buttery. If you’re looking to be a bit more adventurous with your wine, consider reds like a Shiraz or Zinfandel. These two wines pair particularly well if your grilled chicken happens to be smothered in a mouth-watering barbecue sauce. Pinot Grigio, Sauvignon Blanc and medium-dry Rieslings are also popular pairings for grilled chicken.

Grilled Chicken Burger.

Burgers
The staple of many grilling get-togethers, burgers do not necessarily scream “eat me with wine.” More often it’s beer that will accompany a burger, but think outside the box and consider wine. If you are looking to enjoy a red wine with your juicy burger, look to a Zinfandel. Many Zinfandels are full, ripe and have hints of fruits like blackberry. If you would prefer to enjoy a white wine, consider a Sauvignon Blanc, particularly from New Zealand. These wines are full of an herb flavor in combination with tropical fruits, so the wine does not overpower the burger or vice versa.

Vegetables on a grill.

Grilled Vegetables
Typically meat is the star at a barbecue, but if you have vegetarian friends (or just want some tasty veggies), you can load up your grill with vegetables. Again, because vegetables are light, you are going to most likely select a white wine to pair with your veggies. A Chardonnay may not be the first thing you would think of because many have strong notes of oak. However, there are Chardonnays that feature perfect summer fruits like cantaloup, pineapple and lime. If you want to be a bit more exotic with your pairing, try a Gruner Veltliner white. This is comparable to a Sauvignon Blanc but gives a nice change of pace. Veltliner works excellently with grilled vegetables with notes of green pepper and lime.

Your summer barbecue does not have to stock only coolers full of beer. Enhance your barbecue experience by pairing wines with your foods. And remember, the most important rule in pairing wines with foods is to drink what you like!

Woman enjoying a bath

Resveralife Live Well: Are Wine Baths Good for You

So from reading the title, you might think we’ve gone a bit crazy with our love of wine. While we do love wine, and all of its benefits, we aren’t crazy on this one. Resveralife did some research to discover whether the luxurious spa treatment known as the wine bath is indeed beneficial for your health and skin.

Red Wine
By now you know that the antioxidants in red wine provide your body with some health benefits. One of the most talked about (and our favorite!) antioxidant found in red wine is resveratrol. The resveratrol found in red wine helps lower your LDL (bad cholesterol) levels, prevents damage to you blood vessels and works to prevent blood clots.

So why red wine?  Resveratrol is found in the skin of all grapes, so there is an amount in white or blush wines. However, because the grapes are fermented longer with the skins on, there is a higher level of resveratrol in red wine.

Why a Wine Bath?
Perhaps you’ve joked before about how you would bathe in wine if you could, and now you can. But why would you want to? The practice of bathing in wine is known as vinotherapy and is said to boost circulation while healing and helping the body recovery from stress. Professional basketball player, Amar’e Stoudermire of the New York Knicks, is pretty outspoken about how beneficial vinotherapy, or red wine baths, have been for him. He gets vinotherapy at a spa in New York City weekly with a very hot red wine bath, with the red wine being diluted by water. Stoudmermire says he will continue to receive treatments because his entire body, in particular his legs, feel completely rejuvenated after soaking in the bath.

Wine glass and candles next to a bathtub.

Should You Try a Wine Bath?
Only if you really, really want to. While it is entirely possible that a red wine bath helps with feelings of rejuvenation and renewed health, you are more likely to receive the antioxidant benefits by just drinking a glass of your favorite red wine. Many of the beneficial ingredients in red wine are known as phenolic compounds. Phenolic compounds do provide great health benefits, but they do not penetrate the skin well.

If that’s the case, then why bother using any skin care containing phenolic antioxidant compounds? Phenolic compounds can penetrate the skin, but require a bit of time to do so. Chances are a red wine bath lasts about 30 minutes maximum, but when you put on a well formulated day cream or serum, you give the phenolic compounds time to fully penetrate and sink into the skin.

Red wine baths are certainly intriguing and may be a luxurious way to indulge yourself. However, they are more about relaxing than providing serious skin care or health benefits. To really experience the benefits of resveratrol and the other antioxidants present in red wine, it is best to use superior quality skin care products, or take your daily dose in the form of our capsules. And don’t forget, you can always enjoy a glass of red wine!

Cheese and red wine.

Resveralife Eat Well: Zinfandel Food Pairing Guide

Zinfandel wines are often juicy, delicious, a bit hardy and have a good acidity to them. However, these wines also feature a very distinctive set of descriptors that can make it difficult to know how to pair foods with Zinfandel. Resveralife did some digging and we have come up with several pairings that can help bring out the best in your favorite Zinfandel.

Wine bottle and glass on a wooden table.

Zinfandel Information
The Zinfandel grape came to America by way of Austria sometime around 1820. Zinfandel grapes are considered the most “American” grape, partly because these grapes are the only grapes used by American vineyards that do not originate in France.

Zinfandel wines are considered a cult classic and have very unique flavor profiles. Many Zinfandel wines include the flavors of blackberries, sweet cherries, figs and spice. The wines produced from the Zinfandel grape range from robust and elegant to bright and lively. With such domineering flavors, Zinfandel wines provide a problem when it comes to pairing with food.

Food Pairings
Ultimately the food selections you make for pairing with Zinfandel will depend upon the specific Zinfandel you have chosen, but there are several general guidelines that help determine what foods to pair your Zinfandel with.

Meat and red wine.

Meats
Zinfandels pair extremely well with meat. Because Zinfandel has such a strong taste, you can pair this wine with hearty meals. Barbecue ribs are an excellent meat to accompany a Zinfandel. Grill some Italian sausages and enjoy with peppers and onions. If you are looking for a heavy meal, try pairing a Zinfandel with a lamb stew. You could also prepare your favorite burger with high-quality beef as the star next to Zinfandel.

Assortment of wine and cheeses

Cheeses
The type of cheeses that you can pair with Zinfandels vary from mild cheeses such as mozzarella to a sharper cheese such as smoked Swiss cheese. Parmesan pairs well with a variety of Zinfandels as do aged cheddar, aged gouda or asiago cheese. Lighter Zinfandels pair well with milder cheeses such as brie, mild cheddar and gouda cheeses. For Zinfandels that have a bigger, bold flavor, look for cheeses that are robust like cheddar or aged gruyere. Some Zinfandels feature a heavy flavor of spice. These pair best with cheeses like havarti and gorgonzola.

Pasta and red wine.

Pastas
Light Zinfandels pair extremely well with pasta dishes that feature creamy sauces while bolder Zinfandels work best with dishes that are tomato based. If you are drinking a big tasting Zinfandel, try hearty pasta dishes like lasagna and spaghetti bolognese. A lighter Zinfandel works well with  a creamy macaroni and cheese featuring a mild cheddar cheese.

Though Zinfandel wines are not the most popular, in part due to the fact that they make for difficult pairings, they do have a very loyal following. It may take a bit of experimenting until you figure out which Zinfandels pair with certain dishes, but creativity and enjoying new tastes is all a part of the process. Grab a bottle of your favorite Zinfandel and head to your kitchen to try pairing your wine with a great meal.

Red wine and red grapes.

History of Resveratrol

Resveratrol is a polyphenol that is naturally found in sources such as grapes, blueberries, cranberries, billberries and peanuts. Perhaps the most well-known and discussed source of resveratrol is red wine. Research suggests that resveratrol is a key ingredient in red wine that prevents damage to blood vessels, prevent blood clots and reduces your levels of LDL (low-density lipoprotein known as “bad” cholesterol). This polyphenol has been the subject of much research and study for several years, but resveratrol has been used for years.

Early History
In 1940, resveratrol was identified in the roots of a Japanese plant known as white hellebore. Years later, in 1963, resveratrol was also found in the roots of Japanese knotweed, which was used traditionally in Chinese and Japanese medicine. These cultures used Japanese knotweed to treat a large range of medical afflictions from infections, inflammations, liver disease and cardiovascular disease.

Women having red wine in a bar.

The French Paradox
It is widely known that French cuisine features foods that are rich and contain saturated fats, yet the French people are among the slimmest people in the world. Dr. Serge Renaud coined the phrase the “French Paradox” to describe the ability of the French to eat a diet rich in saturated fats and still remain thin. Additionally, the “French Paradox” focused on the fact that French people also suffer low instances of heart diseases. Doctors and researchers theorized that perhaps the alcohol consumption of the French had something to do with their ability to maintain healthy weights and healthy hearts. Specifically, researchers were curious about the amount of red wine that is consumed by the French and whether or not red wine would benefit other diets as well.

The 2000s and Beyond
David Sinclair, of Harvard Medical School, conducted studies the sowed the ability of resveratrol improved the life of yeast cells by as much as 70%. In 2004, another study at Harvard Medical School found that resveratrol lengthed the lifespan of worms and flies. Flies had a lifespan increased by about 30% while worms remained alive 70% longer. Additional studies on resveratrol had the same results; mice given a resveratrol supplement had a longer life expectancy than mice who were not given a resveratrol supplement.

Research and development for resveratrol has provided doctors and researchers with a wide range of the possible health benefits of consuming resveratrol. One of the major areas of study involves the “French Paradox,” which is the study of why the French, who frequently eat foods rich in saturated fats, are able to remain slim and why they have good health especially heart health. Other major studies involve the role of resveratrol in cancer and heart health such as reducing the levels of LDL (“bad” cholesterol) and lowering blood pressure.

While the research on resveratrol continues, many health experts agree that the health benefits of resveratrol are widely beneficial. You can enjoy resveratrol’s benefits by eating grapes, nuts or pouring yourself a glass of red wine. Always consult with your doctor before adding supplements or drastically changing your diet to be sure you are not harming your health more than helping it.

Wine glasses with food in the background

Resveralife Live Well: Sauvignon Blanc Recommendations

Now that you know what food to serve with Sauvignon Blanc (check out our last post), it’s a good time to know what some of the best Suavignon Blanc wines are. There is a large variety of Sauvignon Blanc due in part to the fact the the white grape features a broad range of notes and tastes. Some Sauvignon Blanc wines feature a very citrus-like taste while others have a more “green” or herbaceous flavor. Additionally there are some Sauvignon Blancs that feature heavy notes of oak. Some of Resveralife’s favorite Sauvignon Blancs are:

Robert Mondavi 2011 Fume (Sauvignon) Blanc (Oakville)
This Sauvignon Blanc is a textbook Napa Valley Sauvignon Blanc, For an authentic, and affordable (it retails for $32), you cannot beat the 2011 Fume Blanc. The main notes of the wine are citrusy and fruity, making it a great choice for a summer gathering. The Robert Mondavi 2011 Fume Blanc features heavy notes of lemons, limes, pink grapefruits, gooseberries and rich tropical fruits. Like a true Sauvignon Blanc this wine is completely dry and has a delicious crisp to it. It also has low acidity and just a light touch of oak.

Chalk Hill 2008 Musque Sauvignon Blanc (Chalk Hill)
This California Sauvignon Blanc is another highly recommended wine. The Chalk Hill 2008 Musque Sauvignon Blanc is a vibrant, bright wine with a light acidity to it. True to the name of Sauvignon Blanc this wine is bone dry though finishes with an elegance and complexity. The main notes identified in the Chalk Hill 2008 Musque Sauvignon Blanc are tangerine and lime. This wine also has indulgent notes of honey, making it a perfect treat, though at $40 per bottle, it is a bit pricey.

Guardian Cellars 2012 Angel Sauvignon Blanc (Red Mountain)
Sourced from the Klipsun Vineyard, this Sauvignon Blanc is a dense, pungent white wine. The Guardian Cellars 2012 Angel Sauvignon Blanc is intensely aromatic and opens with notes of the green variety. Opening notes are of freshly mowed grass and hay. The fruity notes experienced towards the beginning are citrus and fig, which is then followed pineapple and additional citrus notes. While the Chalk Hill above features notes of honey, the Guardian Cellars 2012 Angel Sauvignon Blanc has interesting notes of bee pollen and beeswax. Each bottle retails for $20.

Spy Valley 2012 Envoy Single Vineyard Sauvignon Blanc (Marlborough)
The Spy Valley 2012 Envoy Single Vineyard Sauvignon Blanc is generally regarded as much better tasting than the Spy Valley Sauvignon Blanc. Like a traditional Sauvignon Blanc there are fruit notes and this wine opens with notes of citrus and fig. To add a bit of surprise and elegance to the wine the fig and citrus notes are followed by vanilla notes. The wine then features more citrus fruits with the prominent note being nectarines. This Sauvignon Blanc is not quite as dry as others and has a silky texture with a robust finish.

Sauvignon Blanc can be served alongside a variety of foods from a simple salad to a freshly prepared white fish. The above Sauvignon Blanc wines are highly regarded as representative of what a Sauvignon Blanc should taste like.