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Woman holding up fresh beetroot

Vitamin Packed Fall Fruits and Veggies

Have you heard of the Super Sprowtz? You may have seen the colorful Sammy Spinach, Erica Eggplant, Oliver Onion , Colby Carrot and Suzy Sweet Pea singing, “If you’d like to eat healthy, put a veggie on it” to the tune of Beyonce’s, “Put A Ring On It.” in videos and on social media. The Super Sprowtz are the biggest thing to hit the produce industry since the “California Raisins.” Veggies and fruits as superheroes and rock stars is a no-brainer; they must be among one of the most powerful food sources, able to deliver vitamins and nutrients in a single bound. Let’s have a look at some of the superheroes of the fruit and veggie world.

Cranberries
Don’t let the size fool you. Cranberries deliver a punch of antioxidants. They will protect you from free age-related degeneration and free radical damage and save you from urinary tract infection, oral disease, and cancer. Pop some in your pancakes for a healthier breakfast.

Beets
Beets’ superpowers come from their stores of betaine and nitrate. They will fight off super villains like heart and liver and will staunchly support the blood flow to your brain and reduce the risk of dementia.

Kiwifruit
This furry superhero is known for its lung, eye and colon protecting nutrients. They may also help your supervision by preventing macular degeneration. Kiwi is also known for its high level of vitamin E which prevents cancer and also has been known to pack vitamin C, magnesium, copper and potassium.

Pomegranates
This is a wonder fruit if there ever was one. It boosts your cardiovascular system and kicks carcinogens in the butt.

Brussel sprouts and Cabbage
These daredevils are chock full of the powers of vitamins A and C and will deliver with high concentrations of glucosinolates faster than a speeding bullet.

Pumpkin
What would our group of avenging produce be without a super pumpkin? Hurling through the air bursting with alpha-linoleic acid, pumpkin seeds are known defenders against high blood pressure, heart disease, and high cholesterol. Pumpkins are also great sources of alpha and beta carotene to guarantee X-ray vision and cell growth with its alpha and beta carotene.

Pears
Maybe the Boy Wonder of the Superfruits, pears are not only full of antioxidants, they are also considered hypoallergenic because they are so unlikely to incite allergies. They’re also full of vitamin C and fiber to make constipation and other chronic diseases a thing of the past. Holy Smoke!

Apples
If pears are the Boy Wonder, apples are the Superman. They are packed with antioxidants to fight evil doers like chronic illness and can help to slow aging, how’s that for a superpower? Fuji apples are the stars of the apples family, with the highest amounts of phenolics and flavonoids.

How’s that for some super power? If you have any fruits or veggies to add to our list of superheros, let us know. What superpowers does your super fruit/veggie give you?

Woman drinking orange juice

Signs Of Vitamin Deficiencies

So here’s an interesting story. An American decides to live out his golden years in the tropics of Costa Rica. There he meets a German gentleman who owns a couple of acres about 10 miles away from the Pacific coast. A few months later, the American hears that the German gentleman was found singing at a bus stop, completely naked, emaciated, and sick and was promptly sent back to Germany to the waiting arms of his family to recover. How did this happen?

It turns out that the German had decided to put himself on a coconut water fast several months long. Upon examination, it was determined that not only was this man depleted of minerals, he also was suffering from a rather extreme vitamin B12 deficiency leading to hallucinations and psychosis. He was promptly pumped full of the vitamin he lacked and sent back to his tropical paradise to live out the rest of his days.

In these days of veganism, vegetarianism, cleanses and crash diets, vitamin deficiencies can be all too common, and, while you may not find yourself at the point of naked and singing at bus stops, you should be aware of some of the following signs alerting you that your vitamin intake is not where it should be.

Cracks Along the Corners of The Mouth
This can be a sign that you’re not getting enough zinc, B vitamin, iron or protein. Try putting some organic eggs and poultry in your diet, or try some wild caught Alaskan salmon, organic eggs and poultry or tahini. Also, get some vitamin C in there; it will help with iron absorption. Load up on the broccoli, kale, and cauliflower.

Scaly Red Rash and Hair Loss
If you suffer these symptoms, you may have a biotin deficiency. While the body needs biotin to metabolize fats, amino acids, and carbohydrates, it is probably most known for its ability to strengthen nails and hair and is also a key ingredient in most hair, skin and nail vitamin formulas and shampoos. If you’re looking to get some biotin from your food, cook up some raw egg white or down the whole egg raw. Eating raw egg whites alone can actually lead to a biotin deficiency.

Acne-like Bumps on Your Arms, Thighs, and Buttocks
These can be signs that you need more essential omega-3 fatty acids as well as vitamins D and A. You can get omega-3 in anchovies and sardines or in a krill oil supplement. Vitamin A can be found in carrots, sweet potatoes, leafy greens, and red bell peppers; and vitamin D can be obtained through safe exposure to the sun.

Numbness of Hands and Feet
Other signs of B-vitamin deficiency, tingling and prickling in the feet and hands are caused by the effects of the deficiency on the peripheral nerves and can include depression fatigue, anemia and hormone imbalance. If your feet are tingling, try to down some asparagus, spinach, organic eggs and poultry, or grass fed beef.

Muscle Cramps
Muscle cramps can be caused by a lack of magnesium, potassium and calcium. Combat this with some hazelnuts, squash, leafy greens, apples and broccoli.

Let the tale be a precautionary one. Take these steps now to avoid vitamin deficiency or risk public embarrassment. If you have any stories or advice about vitamin deficiencies or public embarrassment for that matter, we would love to hear from you! Feel free to send in comments and stories.

Woman with strawberries in the grass

Avoid Dehydration With These Foods

Italian Tenor Enrico Caruso once said,” Watermelon- It’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.” Any of us that has stuck his or her face into a huge hunk of watermelon will realize the truth of this statement. Indeed, watermelon is a very versatile fruit and, while it is up for debate how well watermelon functions as a facial wash, it definitely provides quenches our thirst and satiates our hunger at the same time.

The importance of hydration is undeniable. Water keeps our bodies functioning properly, and aids in digestion, elimination and physical performance and we are often reminded of the daily goal of eight glasses a day. But while drinking water is not without its benefits, eating it may be even better. Says Dr. Howard Murad, associate clinic professor of medicine at the University of California, “There’s nothing wrong with drinking water, but if we don’t improve the capacity to get it into our cells and keep it there, it goes straight down the toilet without doing us any good.” He argues that the water you eat is different because it is attached to other molecules which help it to enter cells more easily and stay there for a long enough amount of time to be of use. So, what foods can we eat and drink?

Woman with watermelon

1.Watermelon
Caruso didn’t pick this one for no good reason. Although watermelon contains 92% water, it’s the salt, magnesium, and calcium content of this fruit that make it perfect for rehydrating. It’s also a great source of vitamins A and C.

2.Celery
Not just for dipping! Celery sticks are comprised of about 95% water and are high in fiber, vitamin K and potassium. Says Dr. Rachel Berman, registered dietitian, “they’re no packed with nutrients, but that’s also because they’re not calorie dense.” So, you can keep your mouth busy all day for a low calorie fix!

3. Strawberries
Always a beautiful addition to a salad or dessert, strawberries are the wateriest of all berries weighing in at a whopping 92% water and are also packed with Vitamin C and water.

4. Cucumbers
Fans of the movie “Spinal Tap” will remember this vegetable as responsible for setting off the metal detector at an airport when bassist, Derek Smalls, stuffed a foil wrapped one in his pants. Indeed, cucumbers have a plethora of uses. But whether, you eat them, use them on your skin, or shove them down your trousers, they are made up of 96% water, have no cholesterol or fat and are high in iron, vitamin K and vitamin B6.

Woman with spinach
5. Lettuce

Although ice berg lettuce claims a 96% water content, it is not the nutritional champ of the green and leafy veggies. Spinach, butter head and romaine lettuces are a little more heavy weight when it comes to packing a nutritional punch.

In closing, according to Berman, eight glasses is only part of the picture, She recommends 11 cups for women and 15 for men, but, keep in mind, 20% of that should come from food. So start eating your water and let us know how you get your daily water allowance every day. We love to get your input!

Woman eating healthy food

Eat Well: Berries, Spinach and Almonds

Diet is one of the most influential and important factors in your health, and you can improve your health by eating, or avoiding, certain foods. Three incredible superfoods that are easy to incorporate into a diet and that taste great are berries, spinach and almonds. These foods all have the ability to seriously boost your health with benefits ranging from lowering the risk of Alzheimer’s to preventing cardiovascular disease. Below, find out some specific information on why these superfoods should be put on your grocery list right now.

Bowl full of berries.

Berries
Although berries are small, the health benefits they provide for your body are huge. According to a study published in the Annals of Neurology, women who ate two servings of strawberries or one serving of blueberries per week showed delayed and decreased mental decline. “We think that the effect might be related to a class of compounds called anthocyanidins, which is a type of flavonoid. These compounds, found almost exclusively in berries, are known to cross the blood-brain barrier and locate in learning and memory centers in the brain,” explains study author, Elizabeth DeVore, ScD, a professor at Harvard Medical School in Boston. The flavonoids and antioxidants found within berries are also associated with a lowered risk of Alzheimer’s disease. Additionally, the flavonoids in berries are believed to help prevent Parkinson’s disease.

It isn’t just your brain that berries help. Even though berries are sweet, they also have plenty of fiber and liquid, which make these the perfect snack for those looking to manage weight. The liquid and fiber content in berries will help you feel satiated and full in ways that a snack with refined sugar can’t. Although no clinical studies have been done yet, many health experts believe that berries are also a heart-healthy food that can lower your blood pressure. The antioxidants in berries are known to reduce overall inflammation in your body, which contributes to problems like high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease.

Bowl of spinach

Spinach
Popeye made spinach famous when he used it as fuel to fight off foes, and sometimes there is some truth on TV. While you won’t immediately sprout Popeye-sized muscles from eating spinach, you will be getting some amazing health benefits. “Eating spinach is beneficial for maintaining healthy skin, hair and strong bones, as well as helping with digestion, lowering the risk for heart disease and improving blood glucose control in diabetics,” says registered dietician nutritionist, Megan Ware. Just one cup of spinach provides 987 percent of your daily recommended value of vitamin K, which is important in keeping strong bones. A 2003 study found that low levels of vitamin K in women were associated with low bone density (the same is not true for men), and subsequent studies mention how necessary vitamin K is to healthy bone growth. Spinach also is a great source of iron, vitamin A and chlorophyll – which is thought to fight cancer.

Almonds

Almonds
Almonds are a very nutrient-dense food that contain vitamin E, magnesium, copper, B vitamins, iron, phosphorous, calcium, monounsaturated fat and potassium. While almonds are a source of fats, the monounsaturated fats can actually help you lose and maintain weight. One study found that people who consumed nuts twice weekly were 31 percent less likely to put on weight than those who didn’t eat nuts. Additionally, almonds may be beneficial to those who are pre-diabetic or struggle with blood glucose levels because it reduces the spike in blood sugar levels following a meal or snack. Almonds are also considered an excellent food for your heart, because they are able to lower your blood pressure and lower your LDL (bad) cholesterol levels, both of which are major factors in cardiovascular disease.

Berries, spinach and almonds provide health benefits that are absolutely astounding. Just a few servings of these foods each week can go a long way in fighting some very serious diseases, while also improving your skin, hair, bones and tasting great all the while. Whip up a healthy spinach salad that includes berries and sliced raw almonds for an incredible dose of flavor and health.

Woman cutting tomatoes while cooking

Resveralife Eat Well: Recipes High In Vitamin C

Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant that provides benefits far beyond supporting healthy immune function. Vitamin C also helps your body heal wounds and create scar tissue, aids in the growth and formation of tissues all over the body and helps maintain skin, bones and teeth.When it comes to enjoying the benefits of vitamin C you can use a skin care product that contains a derivative of vitamin C, such as ascorbic acid, or you can add foods rich in vitamin C to your diet. There are a ton of foods that will get you your daily recommended allowance of vitamin C and we’ve come up with a few recipes for you to try.

Mango Salsa dish

Mango Salsa
Start your summer with a little fiesta and serve up this vitamin C packed appetizer.

Ingredients

  • 1 mango, peeled and diced
  • 3 roma tomatoes, diced
  • ¼ red onion, finely diced
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro
  • juice of 1 lime
  • optional – 1 jalapeno pepper, deseeded and chopped

Preparation
In a small bowl, combine the mango and tomatoes. Add onion and cilantro. If you are adding jalapeno, add it now as well. Either squeeze the lime directly on top of the mixture or pour lime juice over mixture. Toss everything together and you’re ready to snack on this tasty salsa with your favorite chips.

Avocado, Grapefruit and Papaya Salad

Avocado, Grapefruit and Papaya Salad
This light, fresh and colorful salad is perfect for the warmer summer months. An added bonus is how incredibly quick and easy it is to assemble.

Ingredients

  • 4 cups of mixed greens (add kale for additional vitamin C)
  • 2 grapefruits, peeled and quartered
  • 1 avocado, peeled and sectioned
  • 1 small papaya, peeled and sliced
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon of finely chopped cilantro

Preparation
Grab a medium sized bowl and add the olive oil and lemon juice. Whisk together until well mixed. Add your grapefruits, avocado, papaya and cilantro to the bowl and toss to combine all of the ingredients. Cover your bowl and allow it to sit for at least one hour in the fridge. When you are ready to serve, place a bed of greens on a plate (or in a bowl) and spoon some of the fruit mixture on top.

Broccoli and Parmesan Pasta

Broccoli and Parmesan Pasta
When you want a bit of a heartier meal, try this delicious pasta dish.

Ingredients

  • 1 head of broccoli, washed and chopped
  • 1 16oz container of whole wheat pasta
  • 1 medium onion (yellow or white), peeled and diced
  • 3 cups of vegetable broth
  • 2 cloves fresh garlic, chopped
  • 3 tablespoons of olive oil
  • 1 cup fresh grated Parmesan cheese
  • Cracked black pepper

Preparation
Get a large pot and add your vegetable broth. Bring to a boil. Add your head of broccoli and boil for about three minutes, just until bright green and slightly tender. Remove broccoli with a slotted spoon and bring broth back to a boil. Add your pasta and cook according to the directions on the package then drain. Place onion, garlic and olive oil in a large saute pan and cook over medium heat for about five minutes. Add your broccoli and cook for another minute then remove from heat. Grab a large serving bowl and combine the broccoli mixture and the Parmesan cheese. Add cracked black pepper to taste and serve.

Vitamin C is available in so many fresh fruits and vegetables that your options for creating dishes that are high in vitamin C are virtually endless. Serve up a cauliflower soup or make a tasty tropical fruit salad. You are only limited by your imagination when it comes to creating delicious vitamin C rich dishes.

Resveralife Eat Well: Pinot Noir Pairings

Pinot noir is produced from a red wine grape from the species Vitis vinifera or Pinot noir may be made from predominantly Pinot noir grapes. Pinot noir grapes are grown worldwide, mostly in climates that are cool. The most frequently associated region with Pinot noir grapes is the Burgundy region of France though other regions of note include the Willamette region of Oregon, the Russian River American Viticultural Areas of California and Tasmani and Yarra Valley in Australia. Pinot noir consumption continues to rise in popularity as it is a lighter wine with a lower alcohol content that many wines.

Another reason for the popularity of Pinot noir is the versatility of the wine. Pinot noir is one of the most versatile wines when it comes to food pairings. There are foods that combine with any Pinot noir, while other foods depend upon the particular type of Pinot noir and the preparation of the food. The world of food and wine pairings is no longer limited to red wine with meats and white wine with fish. Modern food and wine pairings are far more creative and a bit more complex. The Resveralife Eat Well Guide features some of the absolute best food pairings for the Pinot noir wine.

Mushrooms and baked potatoes.

Mushrooms
Mushrooms invariably pair well with Pinot noir because they have an earthy, meaty taste. Mushrooms, like the portobello mushroom, often have a meaty taste and texture, which works perfectly with a robust and meaty wine. If you feel ambitious, you can pair your Pinot noir with portobello topped steak, bringing out the richness of both. If you are looking for fare that is a bit lighter, consider a twist on an Italian classic:  mushroom bruschetta. All that is required to make this classic food is a crusty, Italian bread, mushrooms, olive oil, garlic and herbs to suit your taste, such as thyme. For an even more low-key evening, pair your Pinot noir with a hearty mushroom pizza.

Freshly cooked peking duck dish with chopsticks.

Duck
Duck pairs perfectly with Pinot noir for two main reasons. The first reason is that duck has a strong flavor on its own and the second is that duck has a higher fat content than chicken. Even though Pinot noir has light tannins, compliment the fattiness of duck. One pairing that wine enthusiasts rave about is Pinot nNoir with Peking duck. A simpler to prepare pairing is roast duck with Pinot noir.

Salmon with a garnish of wild rice and basmati braised in celery, carrots and onions.

Fish
One of the most popular fish pairings with Pinot Noir is salmon. Though duck pairs well with Pinot noir for the fat content, Pinot is versatile and it also pairs equally well lighter choices such as salmon. Salmon pairs well with Pinot noir because it is a fish with a high oil content and a strong flavor. Salmon would overwhelm a white wine, but it pairs perfectly with the more rich Pinot noir. Preparing an oven roasted salmon with a butter sauce is an easy way to impress your taste buds. Other fishes can be paired with Pinot noir, providing they are a strong flavored fish. Some other fishes that can be paired with Pinot noir include anchovies, herring and mackerel.

Yellow curry with pumpkin and pork.

Pork
Pork, particularly roasted or grilled, pair well with Pinot noir. Pork and Pinot noir both share a sweet type of succulence and smoky undertones. Additionally, the fruitier notes of the Pinot noir bring out the sweet, the tangy and the savory flavors of pork. Pork and Pinot noir is such a popular pairing that there is an annual festival in Sonoma County, Pigs & Pinot, devoted entirely to the pairing of this food and drink.

Pinot noir is one of the best food wines because it pairs well with such a diverse array of foods. Resveralife recommends you to have fun trying different recipes and experimenting with food pairings for your Pinot noir.

Woman with an apple in hand lying on hay.

Resveralife Eat Well: The Hay Diet (Your Guide to Food Combination)

Sometimes necessity really is the mother of invention. William Howard Hay, a New York physician, began developing what later became known as the Hay Diet in 1904. Hay was suffering from numerous medical issues including a dilated heart. Determined to improve his health and extend his life, Hay began researching the impact of diet on overall health. Through his research he created a diet plan meant to remedy his health conditions. In a period of about three months, Hay dropped 50 pounds and was free from his medical problems. Sound intriguing?

Potatoes with a meat dish on a serving plate.

What is the Hay Diet?
To combat his medical issues, a kidney disease, dilated heart and high blood pressure. Hay’s diet consisted largely of meat and potatoes, a staple at dinnertime for many families not only in the past. Many of us still prepare dinner with meat as the protein and some form of carbohydrate as a side dish. Hay decided to go vegetarian as his first plan of attack. He eliminated two meals from his day and only ate vegetables for the third. When Hay reached a weight he considered appropriate, he did not stop the diet. Rather, he continued working on it and researching the link between diet and health.

All of his research and personal experience lead to the conclusion that health is impacted based on the body’s natural chemical process, digestion. The Hay diet claims to work by separating food into three categories:  acid, alkaline and neutral. The body uses an alkaline digestive process for carbohydrates, The digestion of protein is an acidic digestive process. Hay suggested that if alkaline food and acidic food was consumed at the same time, the acid process interrupted the alkaline process. Hay presumed that the combination of incorrect foods caused people to retain excess fluids, gain weight and “drain vitality.” Thus, the Hay diet relies largely on eating according to what type of food you are ingesting.

Fresh vegetables overflowing from a basket.

Following the Hay Diet
This Resveralife Eat Well Guide shows you how to follow the Hay diet. To follow the Hay diet, you must learn which foods are acidic, alkaline or neutral. Hay classified starchy foods and sweets as carbohydrates while fruits were classified as acidic. Vegetables were classified as neutral foods which meant that they could be eaten at the same time as both alkaline and acidic foods. When following the Hay diet, it is no longer advised that you skip two meals per day. We know that food fuels our bodies and as such, we need to feed it. You can still use the Hay diet to your advantage by following the basic tenants of the diet.

  • No meat. The Hay diet as it originally existed when introduced in 1911 forbade meat. You can find protein from other sources such as tempeh, quinoa or in a smoothie by using pea protein powder. Alternatively, if you aren’t willing to forgo meats,  modern applications of the diet allow for lean meats consumed sparingly.
  • Know your food types. Acidic foods (fruits) are divided up into acidic fruits, sub-acid fruit and sweet fruits. Further, melons such as honeydew and cantaloupe are in their own category.
  • As with the acidic foods, alkaline foods are split into separate categories. There are low and non-starchy vegetables and carbohydrates/starches.
  • Identify fats and use sparingly within your diet.
  • Never mix alkaline foods with acidic foods. Ever.
  • Vegetables are neutral and you are free to, and encouraged, to eat them with all meals.

The Hay diet, like any eating plan, has it’s critics. Still, there are numerous advocates for learning what foods alkalize your body and what foods produce an acidic response. Is it really possible to eat yourself thin? Give it a try and find out.

The Shiraz sign on a post in a vineyard.

The Resveralife Eat Well Guide: Shiraz Food Pairings

Shiraz wine is a popular and very versatile wine. There are many different styles of Shiraz wine from intense smoky flavors to lush fruity flavors. The styles of Shiraz vary based on price, age and the region of origin. The Shiraz wine is more or less the same as the Syrah wine. It’s just that the most popular styles of Australia are known as Shiraz. The Australian Shiraz is a distinctive full-bodied red wine.  Australian Shiraz typically features fruity flavors, such as blackberry, and is a less tannic wine than other Shiraz styles. France’s Rhone Valley also produces a signature Syrah. The Rhone Valley Syrah is marked by it’s powerful smokey flavors with hints of black pepper. California Syrah is most closely associated with Australian Shiraz, as the American Syrah is a fruitier wine as opposed to the savory European Shiraz.

When selecting food to pair with a strong, savory Shiraz, such as the French version that elicits hints of bold spices such as black pepper, it is important that the food be equally bold in flavor. Shiraz does not pair well with highly acidic food or meats that are particularly fatty. Devise a main course with the idea of lean meats with strong flavors.

One of the best pairings for a Shiraz, fruity or savory, is brisket. Brisket is a Texas classic made from lean cuts of meat. There is, traditionally, a fat cap near the top of the brisket to add a bit of flavor and richness. The lean meat in brisket becomes a tough meat when grilled quickly. What makes this lean protein source perfect to pair with Shiraz is the rub used for the brisket. Think spices such as paprika, chili powder and black pepper. These spices help highlight the intensity of Shiraz wine.

Glasses of wine by the fireplace.

Another meat that pairs brilliantly with Shiraz is lamb. For an easy, but masterfully paired meal, season lamb with black pepper and salt. Add more complexity to the dish by using spices such as rosemary, garlic and a hearty olive oil. Alternatively, make a hearty lamb stew and pair it with Shiraz. Carrots, potatoes and onions pair nicely with the lamb and add substance to the dish. For the more adventurous, try a mildly spicy venison chili. Venison is a great lean meat to pair with Shiraz and works perfectly in place of beef in chili. As with the brisket, paprika and chili powder are excellent spices to use in a venison chili.

Shiraz, because it is so richly flavored, is not the best wine to select for a night of cheese and wine pairings. Shiraz can be paired with a strong or smoked Cheddar. For a Shiraz that leans to the softer, more fruity side, consider a mild blue cheese. Skip sweeter cheeses and focus on those with distinctive flavor to enhance the boldness of the Shiraz.

Grilled beef fillet served on black plate with chili and pepper.

Most typically, Shiraz is paired with lean proteins such as lamb, lean beef, venison or other game. Do not be afraid to add spice to the dishes chosen for Shiraz wine pairing. Shiraz wine is perfect for pairing with rich, complex spice combinations. Vine Vera recommends you to be creative and experiment with exciting flavors when pairing Shiraz wine with food.

Resveralife Eat Well Guide: Best Fruits and Vegetables this Winter

Some hot chocolate, a blazing fire and cozy blankets… mmm… Winter certainly has its own set of charms, but fresh fruits and vegetables are usually not known to be one of the highlights of the winter season. It can become very challenging to find fresh produce during the winter months, particularly in the colder climates. But, luckily for you, you don’t need to survive on just onions or potatoes throughout winter. All you need to know is what to buy and you should be able to enjoy a regular supply of fresh fruits and vegetables throughout the winter season. This Resveralife Eat Well Guide from Vine Vera helps you understand the best fruits and vegetables to eat this winter.

 

The Best Fruits and Vegetables for Colder Climates

 

Potatoes

Potatoes usually get a lot of negative publicity, but there is a reason they are a staple food in many cuisines around the world. Potatoes are very inexpensive, highly filling and they offer your body with Vitamin C, proteins, potassium, folic acid and magnesium. The best part? They are available throughout the year.

Cabbages

Cabbages are extremely healthy as well as budget friendly. They are full of Vitamin C, Folate and Vitamin K and they also offer you with a rich dose of antioxidants, Glucosinolates and fiber. Certain studies also indicate that cabbages can help to reduce the risk of diabetes and cancer. Although cabbages can be found from the month of July, there are a number of cold weather varieties that harvest throughout the winter season.  This vegetable is best eaten raw as a part of your salad.

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels Sprouts, otherwise known as mini cabbages, are known to be as healthy as their elder cousins. They can protect your DNA from oxidative damage and they also offer you with antioxidants that fight cancer. And since Brussels Sprouts are mainly harvested between the months of September – February, you have a steady stream of fresh ingredients throughout the winter.

Onions

Onions are an ideal way of flavoring almost all of your food items – right from those pastas and soups to those grain salads. Onions offer your body with a rich dose of fiber and Vitamin C and they can also help you to reduce your bad cholesterol levels and increase the good cholesterol levels. Like potatoes, onions are available throughout the year.

Beets

Beets are deep red in color and they have an earthy flavor to them. Beets are extremely unique vegetables that contain an antioxidant known as Betalains. This antioxidant can protect you from a number of degenerative diseases and they also fight cancer. Furthermore, beets are very rich in Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Folate, Potassium and Vitamin B. Unfortunately, fresh beets are only available from the spring season till the fall season.

Carrots

Your parents might have been wrong in making you gulp down all that milk because of its “so called” benefits, but it turns out that they were spot on when it came to those carrots. Carrots are rich in an antioxidant known as beta-carotene. Beta-carotene gets converted into Vitamin A and helps to strengthen the immune system and gives you healthier eyes and skin. Although carrots are mostly available through the fall season, a number of varieties are actually harvested during the winter months.

Parsnips

Parsnips might look a lot like carrots and have a similar rich and earthy flavor, but they offer you with loads of goodies like fiber, Vitamin C, folate and potassium. They go well with most winter soups and are usually at their best during the late fall and early spring seasons.

Sweet Potatoes 

Sweet Potatoes are full of Vitamin C, Vitamin A, antioxidants, fiber and beta-carotene. They are also known to be low on the glycemic index, thereby making them an ideal option for weight conscious people. Moreover, sweet potatoes can be found throughout the year.

 

The Best Fruits and Vegetables for Warmer Climates

 

Citrus Fruits

Citrus fruits are more than enough to help you last the winter seasons. They might not be the best options for your teeth, but they are very beneficial for your skin and your body. They are loaded with Flavanoids and Vitamin C and they can also help in reducing the risks of Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, cataracts and cholera. Some of the best citrus fruits to look at include lemons, blood oranges, grapefruits and oranges. Moreover, citrus fruits only become ripe for picking between the months of October – March.

Pomegranates

Pomegranates are one of the oldest fruits in the world. They date all the way back to the Greco-Roman era. Pomegranates are also known to be one of the most nutritious fruits because of the presence of anti-inflammatory ingredients and antioxidants. This fruit can help you with issues like high blood pressure, high cholesterol and heart attacks.

Dark and Leafy Greens

Greens like kale and collards are an ideal option for your winter diets. They are rich in Vitamin E, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, iron, manganese, calcium, Vitamin K, potassium and antioxidants. They are also known to be extremely low in calories and can fit almost any dish.

Fennel

Fennel has a taste that resembles that of licorice and it is definitely one of the most delicious vegetables on the planet. It is sweet and crunchy and it is also known to be very healthy. Fennel is rich in a compound known as Anethole as well as ingredients like Vitamin C, copper, magnesium and potassium. Fennel is usually available from the fall season till the spring season.

Eat Well: A Resveralife Guide for More Successful Holiday Recipes

Resveralife would like to believe that all there is to recipes is ingredient lists and preparation steps, but that would be far from the truth. There are times when you discover that despite following the recipe to the letter, the dish ends up being an epic fail. Some of the main reasons why recipes end up failing include missing ingredients, incomprehensible terms, lack of personalization, and more. To help you increases your chances of success when it comes to preparing the right recipes, Resveralife brings you an Eat Well Guide for more successful holiday recipes.

Cooking Tips

Start off by properly reading the recipe. Browse through the cooking utensils required, the ingredient list and the cooking time. You’d be surprised at how much the little details matter. If you find certain jargons that seem to be incomprehensible, search for meanings online. When it comes to the picture of the dish being shown in the recipe, don’t get fooled. Your dish won’t look anything like the picture. These photographs were shot by professional photographers in studio environments. The ideal way to start off with recipes is to follow it exactly as mentioned during the first attempt. Do not try to increase/ reduce the portions or substitute ingredients. Once you gain your confidence of preparing the recipe, you can always start experimenting with the ingredients and the flavors. It is also important for you to understand that you should never try out a new recipe when you’re serving them to guests. Always stick to tried and tested methods because it reflects poorly on you if the recipe turns out to be a major flop during an event or a get-together. The ideal place to try out new recipes is during those family meals.

Stay on the lookout for recipes that are explained properly

There are some recipes which are perfectly explained and then there are those which are incomprehensible. The best recipes are always long enough and highly detailed. Short and to the point recipes are usually vague and confusing. The more details and advice a recipe offers, the easier it is to replicate the results. Stick to recipes that follow the most basic recipe rules – a decent introduction, a list of ingredients, nutritional information and preparation steps.

Eliminate the “worst” recipes from the list

We often come across all sorts of recipes in newspapers and magazines that are given by world famous chefs and celebrities – things like “Cupcakes – The Way X Makes Them”. It is important to consider that such recipes are usually full of errors, omissions and estimations. When journalists write about such recipes, it is usually to fill in the article space and interview famous personalities. The focus of the entire recipe is to showcase the chef’s image rather than offer the right recipes to readers. You can always use such recipes as a source of inspiration to improve on your existing recipes, but never base your dishes on these recipes.

Ultimately, when it comes to cooking, you can only get better with regular practice. The more you cook, the more you learn about various tastes and flavors.