Christmas cookies

Traditional Holiday Recipes

When you think of your favorite holiday memories, some of them are bound to include the incredible tastes of the season. Our traditional holiday recipes blend old tradition and new flavors so you can create new memories with the ones you love.

Sugar Roasted Pecan

Sugar Roasted Pecans
The mouthwatering main dishes and scrumptious side dishes often are the center of attention, but sometimes you just want something quick to snack on. These sugar roasted pecans are perfect as an appetizer, snack or even as a dessert!

Ingredients:

  • 1 egg white
  • 1 lb pecan halves
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 cup white sugar

Begin by preheating oven to 250 degrees Fahrenheit and grease a baking dish. In a medium mixing bowl, whisk egg whites and water together until frothy. In a separate bowl, blend sugar, salt and cinnamon, then pour into gallon size plastic bag. Add pecans to the egg white and water and stir until pecans are well coated. Remove pecans and add to plastic bag. Shake well so all pecans are coated. Spread coated pecans evenly onto greased baking sheet. Bake for one hour in preheated oven, stirring every 15 minutes.

Baked brie.

Baked Brie
This warm and cozy appetizer blends sweet and savory in a sophisticated puff pastry. You can substitute the raspberry preserves for nearly anything that suits your preferences like apricot preserves, cranberry chutney or a herb spread.

Ingredients:

  • 1 egg white
  • ½ 17.5 oz package frozen puff pastry, thawed
  • 3 tablespoons raspberry preserves
  • 1 8 oz wheel of Brie cheese

Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit and lightly grease a cookie sheet. Slice Brie in half horizontally so there are two halves. Spread preserves on cut side of the bottom half of the Brie, then place the other half of Brie on top, making a sort of Brie/preserve sandwich. Wrap the entire wheel of Brie with one piece of puff pastry. Flip Brie so the seam of puff pastry is on the cookie sheet and brush with egg white. Bake for 30 minutes or until puff pastry is golden brown. Serve immediately.

Creamy Potatoes Au Gratin

Creamy Potatoes Au Gratin
Mashed potatoes are pretty much a staple at any holiday gathering and while they are delicious comfort food, it can be fun to take a traditional ingredient and get a bit creative with it. Potatoes au gratin makes an excellent accompaniment to your Christmas ham.

Ingredients:

  • 4 large russet potatoes, sliced into ¼ inch slices
  • 1 onion, sliced in rings
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 1 ½ cups shredded cheddar cheese
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose (or whole wheat) flour
  • 2 cups milk
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit and butter a one-quart casserole dish. Layer half of the potatoes into the bottom of buttered casserole dish and top with onion rings. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Melt butter over medium heat in a medium-sized saucepan. Mix in flour and ½ teaspoon of salt. Whisk constantly for 60 seconds and stir in milk. Cook until the mixture is thick, then stir in cheese. Stir cheese until melted, about 30 to 60 seconds. Pour cheese sauce over potatoes and onions and cover casserole dish with foil. Bake 90 minutes in preheated oven.

Soft Ginger Cookies

Soft Ginger Cookies
Gingerbread is one of the most distinctive flavors of the season, but it isn’t suited to everyone’s taste. If you prefer a slightly milder and definitely softer cookie, this ginger cookie recipe is for you.

Ingredients:

  • 2 ¼ cups all-purpose (or whole wheat) flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • 1 egg
  • ¾ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon ground cloves
  • ¾ cup softened margarine
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup white sugar
  • ¼ cup molasses
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • colored sugar sprinkles or additional white sugar

Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Sift together flour, ground cinnamon, baking soda, ground cloves, ground ginger and salt, then set to side. Take a large mixing bowl and cream together the margarine and one cup of flour until light and fluffy. Next, beat in egg, then stir in water and molasses. When well mixed, stir the sifted ingredients into molasses mixture. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 2 (or more but no longer than 24) hours. Shape dough into one inch balls and place on an ungreased cookie sheet. Flatten gently using the palm of your hand or the bottom of a small glass. Sprinkle extra white sugar or colored sugar sprinkles on top of cookies and bake for 8 to 10 minutes in preheated oven. Allow cookies to cool on a cooling rack, then remove from cookie sheet and cool completely on a wire cookie rack. When cool, store in a moist and airtight container.

Traditional holiday dishes vary from family to family, but the tastes of the season are a common thread. Make memories in your kitchen this year when you whip up one, or all, of our tasty traditional holiday recipes.

Eat Well: A Resveralife Guide for More Successful Holiday Recipes

Resveralife would like to believe that all there is to recipes is ingredient lists and preparation steps, but that would be far from the truth. There are times when you discover that despite following the recipe to the letter, the dish ends up being an epic fail. Some of the main reasons why recipes end up failing include missing ingredients, incomprehensible terms, lack of personalization, and more. To help you increases your chances of success when it comes to preparing the right recipes, Resveralife brings you an Eat Well Guide for more successful holiday recipes.

Dishes in kitchen making holiday recipes

Cooking Tips

Start off by properly reading the recipe. Browse through the cooking utensils required, the ingredient list and the cooking time. You’d be surprised at how much the little details matter. If you find certain jargons that seem to be incomprehensible, search for meanings online. When it comes to the picture of the dish being shown in the recipe, don’t get fooled. Your dish won’t look anything like the picture. These photographs were shot by professional photographers in studio environments. The ideal way to start off with recipes is to follow it exactly as mentioned during the first attempt. Do not try to increase/ reduce the portions or substitute ingredients. Once you gain your confidence of preparing the recipe, you can always start experimenting with the ingredients and the flavors. It is also important for you to understand that you should never try out a new recipe when you’re serving them to guests. Always stick to tried and tested methods because it reflects poorly on you if the recipe turns out to be a major flop during an event or a get-together. The ideal place to try out new recipes is during those family meals.Holiday pot roast meal with veggies

Stay on the lookout for recipes that are explained properly

There are some recipes which are perfectly explained and then there are those which are incomprehensible. The best recipes are always long enough and highly detailed. Short and to the point recipes are usually vague and confusing. The more details and advice a recipe offers, the easier it is to replicate the results. Stick to recipes that follow the most basic recipe rules – a decent introduction, a list of ingredients, nutritional information and preparation steps.

Eliminate the “worst” recipes from the list

We often come across all sorts of recipes in newspapers and magazines that are given by world famous chefs and celebrities – things like “Cupcakes – The Way X Makes Them”. It is important to consider that such recipes are usually full of errors, omissions and estimations. When journalists write about such recipes, it is usually to fill in the article space and interview famous personalities. The focus of the entire recipe is to showcase the chef’s image rather than offer the right recipes to readers. You can always use such recipes as a source of inspiration to improve on your existing recipes, but never base your dishes on these recipes.

Ultimately, when it comes to cooking, you can only get better with regular practice. The more you cook, the more you learn about various tastes and flavors.