Woman touching her face

Skin Thickness Explained

It is often said that one needs thick skin to survive in this world. If you have thick skin, you’ve got what it takes; you’re a tough cookie, a fighter. But not all of us have thick skin. Some of us are thin skinned. We are sensitive, vulnerable, delicate and in need proper care and attention, and indeed this too has its positive attributes: thin skin, warm heart. The same is true of your actual skin. Some parts of our body are made up of thick skin, designed for rough play, while other parts are thinner, requiring extra pampering and higher maintenance. So to help navigate the path through the thick and thin, let’s have a look at the literal meanings of these terms.

Face
Our face is our calling card. It is the most noticeable body part and unfortunately, the one most susceptible to damage. That’s because is almost always in contact with elements like the sun and UV rays. It is also particularly thin and subject to signs of aging. Skin around the eyes is even thinner. Whereas the average thickness of the epidermis is about 0.1 mm, the skin around the eyes is only 0-0.05 mm.

Hands
If you look at your hands, you will notice that the skin on your palm is markedly different from that on the back of the hand. The skin on the balls of your finger and palms is thick, robust , and hair-free with no sebaceous glands. It also has a high density of perspiration glands, hence the expression “sweaty palms” The skin on the palm is well-padded with connective and fatty tissue and is short on natural moisturizing factors (NMFs) and subject to dryness. In contrast, the skin on the backs of hands is very thin with barely any fatty tissue and has only a few thin hairs. Because the skin on the hands is less able to stabilize moisture binding elements, they are more likely to dry out. In addition, they are also probably the hardest working parts of our body and are often exposed to lipid- stripping factors which can result in damage to the skin’s natural repair and protection systems.

Feet
The soles of our feet contain more fat cells in the innermost layer of our skin than any other body part, and well they should, because that’ s where the padding is needed. Our poor feet bear three times our body weight with each step and are also subjected to pressure from tight shoes and a lot of running and walking. Even with their heavy duty padding, skin barrier on the feet can be damaged by rubbing, causing calluses and corns to appear.

Skin Care for Different Body Parts 

Face
It is important to cleanse your face in the morning and evening. Cleansing in the morning removes sebum to ensure that your skin is prepared for application of protective products. At night, cleansing will remove dirt and makeup and help prepare for evening skin care. Sun protection is also essential in the morning and is vital in keeping skin healthy.

Woman applying hand cream

Hands
With our hands so prone to dehydration, there is a need to keep them well moisturized and prevent the cracking and drying which can lead to contact dermatitis. Avoid harsh detergents and try to wash hands with warm water rather than hot.

Feet
It may be of little surprise to hear that 70% of foot problems are caused by ill fitting shoes, lending a new depth to the expression “Killer Heels.” Avoiding tight fitting shoes or using pressure- reducing rings and softening creams will help. Feet should be washed regularly and medical foot care products should be applied when needed.

Through thick and thin, our skin has always helped us “keep it together”. Let us know how you care for it. We love to hear from you!



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