Woman applying sunscreen

SPF 30 vs SPF 50

When you shop for sunscreens, you’ve probably noticed products available with SPFs ranging from 15 to 100. You would think an SPF of 100 would be more effective than one of 15, but it’s not as simple as that. So, what exactly do all these numbers mean?

SPF refers to a sunscreen’s ability to block UVB rays, but not UVA rays. UVB rays cause sunburns while UVA rays are more closely linked to deeper skin damage. Both kinds of rays can contribute to skin cancer. The SPF rates measure the amount of time it would take for you to sunburn without sunscreen as opposed to the amount of time it would take you to burn with the sunscreen on. But Florida dermatologist. James M. Spencer, MD, explains, “SPF is not a consumer friendly number. It is logical for someone to think than an SPF of 30 is twice as good as an SPF of 15, but that’s not how it works.”

Spencer further explains that SPF 15 will block about 94% of UVB rays while an SPF 30 blocks 97% and an SPF 45 blocks about 98%. “After that it just gets silly,” says Spencer. Doctors like Farah Ahmed, general counsel for the cosmetics industry group Personal Care Products Council, tends to agree, but adds that high SPF products may protect better against long term skin damage and exposure related skin cancers. Generally, an SPF of 30 is recommended.

Dr. Steven Q Wang, MD and director of dermatologic surgery and dermatology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, points out ways in which using sunscreens with a higher SPF can even have negative effects. Since SPF protects against UVB rays only, and UVB rays are responsible for sunburn, individuals may not burn while using these sunscreens. However, this does not mean they are not susceptible to damage from UVA rays which cause premature aging. To these lengths, Europe and Australia have adopted UVA testing guidelines and measurement standards and capped the SPF of sunscreens at 50. The U.S. Food and Drug Association may follow suit.

Resveralife-spf-30-vs-spf-50-spf-50-spf50

Wang also points out that people who are wearing an SPF of 50 or higher, may adopt a false sense of security and may stay out in the sun longer. They may not make wise choices like seeking shade or wearing sun protective clothing. Sun damage can take place even if skin is not becoming tan or reddening.

No matter what produce you choose, water resistant sunscreen should be applied liberally a half hour before you go outdoors and should be reapplied every two hours or after you are swimming or sweating. Look for broad spectrum sunscreens with ingredients like zinc oxide and titanium dioxide, which are less likely to wash off and effectively protect against both UVA and UVB rays. Avoid avobenzone products which are not stable and oxybenzone, which is absorbed into your skin and has demonstrated to be a hormone disruptor.

So, what’s your number? Let us know in the comments section below!

Woman holding sunscreen

Save Your Skin From the Sun

Don’t leave your skin vulnerable to sun damage this summer! Follow these simple steps to keep your skin safe, so the only thing you have to worry about this summer is finding a good chair at the pool and an ice cold beverage.

Layer
Don’t expect your makeup to serve as your only protection! Use a moisturizer with SPF 30 as well as a foundation or tinted moisturizer with sun protection. Also, give your moisturizer some time to really sink into the skin before you move on to your primer- you don’t want to risk wiping off your protection when you move on to the next step of your routine!

Reapply
Most sunscreens will only protect your skin for a few hours- especially if you are at the pool or the beach! You should reapply your SPF a few times a day- or every 80 minutes if you are swimming or sweating. Read the label on the bottle to figure out exactly how often it is suggested to reapply for each brand of sunscreen or moisturizer. Don’t forget to throw a bottle of sunscreen, or a setting spray with SPF, in your bag before you leave the house to ensure your skin will be protected all day long!

Don’t Forget your Eyes!
Even if you use a moisturizer with SPF religiously, you may be neglecting some of your most sensitive skin- the areas around your eyes. Some kinds of sunscreen can sting your eyes, so try to find an eye cream or concealer formulated with SPF to protect those peepers!

Woman wearing sunglasses

Accessorize
Always getting those painful sunburns where your hair is parted? Try throwing on a cute, wide brim hat next time you’re going to be outside for an extended period of time. Oversized sunglasses are also a trendy way to protect your eyes from sun damage. Mix up your looks this summer with cool accessories, and protect your skin at the same time!

Don’t Stop at Your Face
While wearing sunscreen on your face every day is important, we tend to spend more time outside during the warmer months, so extending our sunscreen coverage is essential. Applying sunscreen to your ears, neck, chest, shoulders, and hands can do a lot to help protect your skin from sun damage. It doesn’t take long for the stronger summer sun to harm your skin, so adding these extra steps to your morning routine will help you remember to do this every day!

Limit Sun Exposure
We’ve all heard this tip, and no one likes to follow it, but whenever possible, it is best to limit your sun exposure during peak hours. Taking a lunch break inside while the sun is highest in the sky (and using this time to reapply your sunscreen) can help decrease your chances of getting burnt. We hate to say it, but less sun is always better for your skin’s health.
No need to skip out on all of the fun outdoor activities that summer brings, but don’t forget to protect your skin first!

Vials of botanical oils surrounded by flowers

Oils To Have In Every Medicine Cabinet

While many of deal with medicines that may cause harmful side effects, others realize that there are safe, affordable products which are as accessible as our nearest grocery store. These are essential oils, many of which have remarkable benefits that can help us with physical and mental ailments. Read on to find out which essential oils no medicine cabinet should be without.

Cedar Oil
Its rich woody scent can be emotionally grounding and help relieve nervous tension. When applied directly to skin or in a bath, it can reduce the skin peeling and infection associated with eczema. When added to shampoo, conditioner or rubbed into scalp, it can increase circulation in the hair follicles to reduce hair loss and fight dandruff.

Frankincense
When inhaled it reduces heart rate and high blood pressure, as well as anxiety and depression. It has immune enhancing abilities which may help destroy dangerous bacteria, viruses, and even cancers. It helps strengthen skin, improving its tone, elasticity and defends against bacteria and blemishes.

Tea Tree Oil
Mix with raw honey to make a homemade, gentle acne face wash. It’s considered to be just as effective as benzoyl peroxide without the associated negative side effects. It is beneficial to the scalp as it soothes dry flaking skin and can eliminate dandruff. Tea tree oil’s ability to kill off bacteria makes it effective in oral health. Mix tea tree oil with coconut oil and baking soda for an amazing homemade toothpaste.

Orange Oil
Limonene, a monocyclic monoterpene that’s present in orange peel oil is a defender against oxidative stress, and even has cancer fighting abilities since monoterpenes have been shown to be effective against tumor growth. When diluted, orange oil makes a great cleaner. Use it to clean countertops and appliances without chemicals. It leaves behind a great citrusy smell. Adding orange oil to a shower wash or perfume, or inhaling it directly can lift your mood and bring on relaxation.

Lemon Grass Oil
Lemon grass oil has a strong citrus scent that is proven effective for headaches, muscle pain, and stress. It can also be used as a skin toner as it helps to close open pores. When applied to sweaty feet, it can reduce excessive perspiration.

Fennel Oil
Fennel oil has estrogen-like compounds which can have a balancing effect on hormones. It’s helpful for women suffering during menopause, and can also help women with low estrogen levels. Fennel oil is also great for treating cramps, nausea, and indigestion. Use fennel oil orally for fighting gum disease and freshening breath.

Basil Oil
Basil oil has antiviral properties and is a great expectorant for congested nasal passages when added to steaming water. Basil oil is also effective at relieving pain as it is an antispasmodic.

Bergamot Oil
Bergamot oil is considered a powerful antidepressant known for its cheering properties. When diluted in alcohol, bergamot oil is great for cold sores, chicken pox and shingles as it inhibits viral activity.

Woman looking in the mirror

Pimple Classification and Treatment

Pimples are never a fun thing to have to deal with. Nobody likes having unsightly, sometimes painful blocked pores to deal with, especially when they catch you by surprise or linger way longer than they should. And to make matters worse, not all pimples are created equal, and as such some require different treatment than others, and some are more severe than others. So how do you tell the difference, and how do you know which ones you can take care of at home and which ones you need a dermatologist’s help with? Keep reading and you’ll find out.

What’s a Pimple?
You might not think we’d need to define what exactly a pimple is, but it’s important to clarify before we move on; it’s always a good habit to review a concept before examining it in further detail. The term “pimple” is a broad umbrella term that encompasses a variety of localized infections that all share the common trait of occurring within pores that have been blocked by some form of debris (anything from oil to makeup you forgot to take off can do it) and as such, ceased to function properly—pores need to be open to “respire” and do their job properly.

Blackheads and Whiteheads
The most common and, thankfully, least serious, and easiest to deal with pimples are blackheads and whiteheads. Both tend to be rather tiny. Blackheads are clogged pores that remain open, so the blockage is easily visible and has a blackish appearance. Whiteheads are similar but have closed up around the blockage and appear more whitish. Both can be treated with products that contain salicylic acid, and may benefit from light to moderate exfoliation. Give it a few weeks, resist the urge to pop (seriously, you don’t want the acne scars; don’t do it), and they’ll more than likely go away. If they don’t, though, feel free to talk to a dermatologist about other methods of treatment. It’s unlikely you’ll have to, though, as blackheads and whiteheads should respond to daily salicylic acid treatment (look for face washes, scrubs, and even moisturizers with this ingredient) and once to twice-weekly exfoliation.

Papules and Pustules
These are the “middle of the road” pimples, meaning it’s a coin flip whether you’ll be able to take care of them on your own or need to see the doctor. Pustules and papules are pimples that have grown so large the pore walls have broken. Papules are hard bumps in the skin, while pustules are a bit softer and visibly filled with pus. Again, resist the urge to pop. Try salicylic acid and exfoliation as described above, but seek immediate treatment by a dermatologist if this isn’t working after three or so weeks.

Nodules and Cysts
The worst, but fortunately, least common types of pimples are nodules and cysts. These are blocked pores which have gotten irritated and expanded outward and inward (they go deeper into your skin and are visibly much larger than any other pimple type). Nodules are hard, while cysts are softer to the touch and may be visibly reddened and irritated. If you have any nodules and/or cysts, don’t waste time with home treatment. Make an appointment with a dermatologist today.

Woman getting her skin examined

Petechiae or Pinprick

You may or may not have heard the term “Petechiae,” but you’ve probably seen its effects on the skin. Petechiae are tiny spots that appear on the skin and look like little pinpricks. They often appear in clusters, and can look like a rash if there are a lot of them close together. Usually, Petechiae are harmless, and will go away after a few days.

Causes: 

Petechiae are caused when capillaries in your skin break and bleed. Many different things can cause capillaries to break:

  1. Straining for an extended time: Extended periods of strain can cause capillaries to break, resulting in Petechiae. Even something as simple as intense coughing can cause capillaries to break and bleed. Things like holding your breath, weightlifting, and many other activities can also cause the kind of bleeding that leads to Petechiae. These types of activities often cause Petechiae to form on the face, often around the eyes and mouth. These types of Petechiae will usually clear up on their own, but can cause discoloration on the face.
  2. Side Effects of Certain Medications: If you don’t know what is causing the spots that are forming on your skin, check to see if Petechiae is listed as a side effect of any medication you may be on. There are several different medications that can result in broken capillaries, including penicillin.
  3. Medical Conditions: Common illnesses like mononucleosis and strep throat can cause Petechiae, but the spots can be indicative of very serious conditions as well. Things like leukemia and endocarditis are also associated with the formation of Petechiae. Be sure to consult your doctor if you notice a lot of broken capillaries that are not going away to make sure there is not an underlying cause.
  4. Injuries and Extreme Sunburn: Victims of strangulation or smothering will often have Petechiae on their faces, and people involved in car crashes can develop the condition as well. Extreme sun exposure can also result in broken capillaries in some cases.

Treatments: 

  1. The first step is to figure out what is causing broken capillaries to bleed. If you can’t find out what is causing the condition, see a doctor immediately. They will help you figure out if the cause of the Petechiae is serious.
  2. Treat the cause. The Petechiae will heal on their own, but if you aren’t treating the cause, more will form. This may mean taking it easy at the gym, taking the time to recover from a cold, taking medication for strep throat or another illness, or switching medication to one that doesn’t cause Petechiae.
  3. While you are waiting to Petechiae to heal, putting an ice pack on the affected areas can help ease any swelling or discomfort that the broken capillaries cause.
  4. Give it time. Unfortunately, Petechiae can only slowly dissipate on their own. Taking it easy and giving your body time to heal itself is really the only way to go!
Woman applying face mask

Types of Facial Masks

Every skin type can benefit from a facial mask. The problem isn’t enjoying them; it’s finding the perfect type for each skin type and skin problem. There seems to be an endless list of combinations to try and narrowing down the choices can be frustrating at times.

Face masks can accomplish a plethora of skin-boosting benefits. They can soothe dry skin, eliminate and prevent blemishes, prevent oily spots and help skin glow. Here are some of the best types of facial masks to improve skin.

 

Woman taking off her eye mask

Eye Masks
If a specific area of the face needs to be treated, a full facial mask might not be necessary. Eye masks are a great way to get fast, great results for puffy eyes and wrinkled, sagging skin. They can be applied during the morning while eating breakfast or completing a few tasks around the home. Results last all day, if not longer, and with plenty of over the counter treatments available, there’s no need for measuring or mixing.

Coffee Masks
Just like it helps to perk up your brain, a facial mask with coffee as the main ingredient can perk up facial skin. It can help with under eye puffiness and really brighten up the complexion, all in a matter of minutes. The smell is also heavenly and surprisingly relaxing.

Charcoal Masks
For those who have never tried a charcoal mask, the benefits can be incredibly impressive. Activated charcoal can help to draw out impurities from pores and prevent blemishes from ever forming in the first place, while eliminating any existing imperfections. For anyone suffering from acne, a charcoal mask is highly recommended as both a treatment and preventative measure.

Woman applying clay mask

Clay Masks
Probably the most popular type of facial mask, clay masks work for pretty much every skin type. They’re versatile yet effective. Despite clay masks being the most popular, most people use them incorrectly. It’s important to understand that the mask is doing the most for your skin when it is still damp. If the mask is allowed to completely dry, it can actually have a negative effect by causing irritation and dehydration.

Homemade Masks
Making homemade masks out of ingredients found in the refrigerator seems to be all the rage lately. Mother Nature has provided plenty of fresh ingredients that can transform skin. There’s really no limit to what can be mixed together. Try berries, avocado, yogurt, honey, oats and more. Just be sure to mix the ingredients right before using them and avoid storing leftovers for too long.

Facial masks are a great way to improve skin tone, eliminate blemishes and add a refreshing and energizing glow. Use facial masks for special occasions, as part of a weekly skin care regimen or on an as needed basis for skin issues.

Whether homemade or store-bought, facial masks should always be used according to specific instructions to avoid negative side effects. Never be afraid to try a new facial mask. There’s always a new combination of beneficial ingredients to experiment with.

Woman smoking outside

Smoking & Skin Aging

Smoking is an unappealing habit. It leaves you with bad breath, yellow nails, and moreover is linked to a vast host of health conditions such as lung cancer and even depression. What you may not fully realize however is that smoking also leads to significant premature aging of the skin and causes wrinkles, furrows and thinning lips. There’s really no soft way of saying this – if you smoke cigarettes, you need to stop. Many scientists have also stated that smoking adds between 10 and 20 years to your natural age.

It is estimated that around 1 million people start smoking in the United States every year and virtually all will go on to regret this decision as they find out the effect this poisonous habit has on their health, bodies and skin. Some studies have established that smoking is actually worse for women as the nicotine is more addictive. Women who smoke are also twice as likely to have heart attacks, strokes and lung cancer than their male counterparts.

How Does Smoking Age the Skin
The effects of smoking on skin have been known for a long while. One study as early as 1965 identified what is now known as ‘smoker’s face’. What has become more apparent in recent years is exactly how smoking causes premature aging. There are numerous mechanisms by which smoking accelerates aging. It begins with the formation of free-radicals in the body when exposed to cigarette smoke. Free radicals are unstable molecules that cause disease and damage to cell DNA. Smoking also restricts blood flow to the minuscule veins in your skin known as capillaries preventing oxygen and vital nutrients from doing their job. All in all, this leads to a dull, grayish skin tone which has an obviously discolored look.

Additionally, smoking increases production of enzymes that break down collagen in the skin which is integral to maintaining its elasticity. Smoking for many years will also deplete stores of vitamins A and C, both of which are involved in skin protection and health and help to keep harsh UV rays at bay.

Finally, the actions involved in continually sucking on cigarettes and squinting from cigarette smoke causes deep lines to develop around the eyes and mouth. Smoking doesn’t just cause wrinkling on your face, it is also associated with damage and sagging on nearly all parts of the body including your inner arms and neck.

Reversing Skin Damage
Many smokers wonder if they can reverse the damage they have caused to themselves by smoking. Simply put, the best thing you can do to begin the reversal process is stop smoking – although you must realize you will never fully undo the damage that you’ve done. Healthy diets and supplements are great at maintaining skin health. You should also be aware that skin damage won’t usually appear until 10 or 20 years after you began smoking. A proper skin care regimen using anti-aging and moisturizing creams can also assist in preventing the formation of further wrinkles and fine lines.

Asian woman touching her face

Trending: The Asianification of Skin Care

The influence of Asia on beauty concepts, techniques, and treatments, also referred to as Asianification, took 2015 by storm and it’s showed no sign of slowing down in 2016. The global beauty business is massive, and Asia certainly seems to be at the forefront of it. Many western consumers are becoming increasingly focused on using products that include more natural elements. It’s also about products that combat environmental factors while helping skin to look more youthful with a glowing-from-the-inside-out appearance. The more benefits the product has, the better. Japan has long been a hot spot for trends, but there’s also an increase in fantastic developments emerging from South Korea and China. BB Creams have already been incorporated into many a beauty arsenal, but let’s talk about some other beauty trends that could take your skin care regimen to another level.

Sleeping Masks
The skin works hard to repair itself while you’re sleeping, and helping it along a bit can do wonders for waking up with skin that looks refreshed, hydrated, and brighter. Sleeping masks can add a huge dose of moisture to dry skin. You typically use it only once or twice a week, leave it on overnight, then wash it off in the morning.

Cushion Compact
They’ve been around for awhile, but the popularity of cushion compacts is steadily increasing. The product basically consists of airtight packaging that includes a sponge that’s soaked in the foundation. You can build up the lightweight multi-tasking formula on your skin and it provides even coverage. Additionally, if you’ve ever had a foundation spillage in your purse, you already know a cushion compact can be a big asset.

Splash Masks
It’s the “mask” that doesn’t require slathering a product on your face and letting it sit there for 15-minutes. All you have to do is add the liquid to water, splash it onto your face, pat it in, and you’re done. The concentrated ingredients can do wonders for your skin and all it takes is less than a minute to get them going.

Sheet mask

Sheet Masks
Using sheet masks can take a little getting used to considering on your face is a piece of cloth or paper that’s soaked with ingredients and has strategically cut holes in it. The mask presses all the good ingredients onto your face for the directed amount of time, then you’ll toss out the mask and usually pat the remaining ingredients into your skin rather than wash your face. They’re individually packaged and – depending on the mask – you can buy them in singles or in a box of multiples. There are a variety of different types of sheet masks, however, so it’s all about finding one that’s best for you.

Women from Japan, South Korea, and China know what they’re talking about when it comes to beauty and skin care. They’re smart, educated about the products and techniques, and they expect to get good results for their money. One of the great things is that many of these products don’t cost a substantial amount of money, especially for the exceptional results that they provide. It’s no surprise that Asianification has taken hold of the global beauty world.

Woman with mature skin

Perioral Region Fine Lines and Wrinkles

Think about how many times throughout the day you make facial expressions – you may not even be able to come up with a number because it happens so frequently. Over time, these expressions result in facial lines and wrinkles as your skin loses its collagen and elasticity. Perioral lines are common among aging women, and there are ways that you can help to prevent and treat these fine lines. Keep reading to learn more about perioral lines and how you can get rid of them.

What are Perioral Fine Lines and Wrinkles?
Perioral fine lines and wrinkles are those that occur around the mouth and lip areas. There are three major types of perioral fine lines and wrinkles:

  • Smile Lines (Nasolabial Lines) – Smile lines are the lines that run from the bottom of your nose to the corners of your mouth. These often start small and progressively deepen with age.
  • Marionette Lines – Marionette lines often result in an angry or sad looking face as you age. These lines are vertical fine lines and wrinkles found at the corners of your mouth and they can give your mouth a naturally downturned appearance that can make you look angry or sad even when you are completely relaxed.
  • Vertical Lip Lines – Smoking is one of the leading causes of vertical lip lines for two reasons: the constant lip pursing and the damaging chemicals, toxins and free radicals that result from smoking. Nearly all women, even non-smokers, end up with vertical lip lines because they are caused by repeated motion of the lips. Things like pursing your lips and drinking through straws also result in vertical lip lines.

Woman touching her face

Prevention and Treatments for Perioral Fine Lines and Wrinkles
You can’t live your life completely expressionless, but learning how to relax your facial muscles is a good start in preventing perioral fine lines and wrinkles. Facial massage is a great way to provide your muscles with much-needed relaxation, and you can do a quick two-minute massage at the end of your nighttime facial routine or as your apply an antioxidant serum. If you are a smoker, quit now. Always remember to apply sunscreen to every area of your face, and follow a healthy lifestyle that includes drinking plenty of water.

There are multiple ways you can treat perioral fine lines and wrinkles, including:

  • Facial Exercises – Giving your face a nice massage can help to smooth the appearance of wrinkles, and performing facial exercises are a way you can help strengthen your muscles. When you lose collagen in the perioral region, fine lines and wrinkles become more prominent. Using facial exercises tones your muscles, and when you have sufficient muscle tone, it can make up for the lack of collagen in your skin and decrease the appearance of wrinkles.
  • Topical Treatments – Anti-aging creams, serums and targeted treatments are all ways that you can help treat perioral fine lines. Look for skin care products that use antioxidants like vitamin C or resveratrol, that have moisturizing agents like hyaluronic acid and/or products that contain retinol. All of these ingredients help to fight the appearance of existing wrinkles and help prevent the formation of new fine lines.
  • Botox and Fillers – Injectables are a common way to diminish the look of fine lines and wrinkles. Injectables like hyaluronic acid help to plump up your skin and smooth wrinkles, while Botox paralyzes the muscles around the face, keeping them in a permanent state of relaxation. It is important to note that while these treatments are effective for wrinkles, the results are not permanent and typically last for a few months.

When it comes to preventing signs of aging, including perioral fine lines and wrinkles, sunscreen is the best anti-aging weapon you can use. A skin care routine full of quality ingredients like retinol and resveratrol will also significantly impact the appearance of your fine lines and wrinkles. Be consistent with your skin care routine and give your face some extra attention with exercises and massages to see your perioral fine lines and wrinkles diminish and disappear.

Woman squinting at laptop

Does Squinting Cause Fine Lines?

Beauty is surrounded by many rules, guidelines and myths and it can be daunting to keep up with everything that you are or are not supposed to be doing to and for your skin. If you’ve ever heard that squinting your eyes can cause fine lines and wrinkles, you’ve heard correctly. This is one beauty myth that is absolutely true. Keep reading to find out why squinting causes more fine lines and wrinkles and what you can do to prevent additional wrinkles under and around your eyes.

Does Squinting Cause Fine Lines and Wrinkles?
Unfortunately, squinting really does lead to more fine lines and wrinkles. When you squint, whether you’re trying to watch TV, read your book and check emails on your computer, you are contributing to more fine lines and wrinkles around your eyes. Dawn Davis, M.D, a dermatologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota says “…when you squint the muscles around your eyes grow stronger, and it’s kind of like a workout; therefore, the overlying skin will wrinkle.”

How to Prevent Wrinkles
The skin under and around your eyes is thinner and more delicate than the skin on the rest of your face, so it is more susceptible to fine lines and wrinkles. While you can never prevent all wrinkles, there are some lifestyle changes you can make to keep yourself from squinting as often and causing more fine lines than necessary.

  • Get an Annual Eye Exam – Often, squinting is a response to not being able to see properly and visiting your optometrist once a year is an excellent way to make sure that your vision is in check. Your optometrist will be able to provide you with prescription glasses, sunglasses or contacts so that you can see clearly without having to squint.
  • The Sun – You’re probably excited about how close spring is because you can bask in warm weather and sunlight, but the sun is another primary cause of squinting. You can prevent squinting due to the sun by wearing sunglasses and hats to keep the sun out of your eyes.
  • Move Away From the Screen – Computers are amazing and you probably can’t imagine your life without one, but they can be quite hard on your eyes. Dr. Julia Tzu of Wall Street Dermatology in New York City, New York suggests that you sit about 1.5 to 2 inches away from your computer screen to help prevent eye strain. Additionally, you should take two to three quick breaks away from your computer screen every hour to give your eyes time to rest, according to New York City based dermatologist, Dr. Janet Prystowsky.

Squinting does indeed cause fine lines and wrinkles, but you can fight back against them by making the above lifestyle changes. To most effectively reduce fine lines and wrinkles under and around your eyes, you should combine the above advice with a high-quality anti-aging eye cream. Put on your glasses and step away from the computer once in awhile to reduce the amount of time you spend squinting, and ultimately to reduce fine lines and wrinkles.